#1
Can someone point out all the differences between the two and make a comparison? Sound wise, look-wise, feel-wise, etc....

And please dont be like one is an Acura the other is a Ferrari. I'm not a guitar n00b
#2
one is better then the other. If that's not enough for you then it's not enough. No one is going to be able to list bullet point style the differences that would convince you one way or another.

Go to a store, play one then the other. If you don't feel it then it doesn't matter.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#3
if you arent a guitar noob than you should no the major differences between the two. all it takes is a little effort and you can find your answers
R.I.P. Randy Rhoads
#4
Well me personally actually being a noob makes it difficult, but from what i've gathered...

Gibson cuts the cost on studios by using cheaper hardware, tuners, pickups, probably wood, and they're massively produced so they're pretty much an Epiphone made in the US with a more impressive name on the headstock.

There would be subtle differences in sound but only the purists that like spending 2000+ on a guitar would notice. They are designed to feel like a million bucks. IMO you're really paying for a name when you buy a studio.

Hope that helps, and if someone points out I'm a complete loser and don't know what I'm talking about then we'll both get some answers.
-Tim
#5
Cheaper materials used to build the guitar. Still a nice guitar, but a custom is arguably the greatest guitar ever made. Play one of those then pick up a studio and youll tell a difference right away. It just feels like a million bucks.
- Paul Reed Smith Custom 24
- Fender USA Strat
- Orange Rockerverb 50 Head
- Orange PPC-212OB Cab
- Marshall JTM600 Head
- Marshall JTM410 Cab
#7
Quote by somemaycallmeti
Well me personally actually being a noob makes it difficult, but from what i've gathered...

Gibson cuts the cost on studios by using cheaper hardware, tuners, pickups, probably wood, and they're massively produced so they're pretty much an Epiphone made in the US with a more impressive name on the headstock.

There would be subtle differences in sound but only the purists that like spending 2000+ on a guitar would notice. They are designed to feel like a million bucks. IMO you're really paying for a name when you buy a studio.

Hope that helps, and if someone points out I'm a complete loser and don't know what I'm talking about then we'll both get some answers.
-Tim


anyone could tell the difference between a gibson custom and a cheap studio. Hell my roommate and my friends thought the r8 sounded better then my andersons. I cried.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#8
Studios are the lower end Les Pauls. Although you'll still get the Les Paul sound, you loose some of the feel. ( This is coming from a Les Paul Custom Owner)
The main things you'll notice between that and a standard/custom/ect.
No binding on the neck. Frets are not bound over.
No binding on the sides and back. Kinda a smoother feel, its all preferance.
On the studios I've played, the top carve feels different compared to mah custom.
Ebony Fretboards
I belive the LPC's have more wood to em than studios.

Look-wise
Custom have Mother-Of-Pearl Block inlays
Bound Headstocks
Headstock inlays
Nicer tops
Binding
More Classier look to em.

Go for a Custom if you can. Its a great instrument and you'll love it. Studios are fine too, but almost everyone has wanted a Les Paul Custom at one point. Many Many MANY famous guitar playeres who demand the best played a Les Paul Custom at one point. Thats what makes the Les Paul Custom real special to me.
#9
Quote by ATL_aftermath
Can someone point out all the differences between the two and make a comparison? Sound wise, look-wise, feel-wise, etc....

And please dont be like one is an Acura the other is a Ferrari. I'm not a guitar n00b

I'm sorry to say this, but that IS the answer.

apart from cosmetic differences like the custom having all those nice little frills, on paper they are more or less the same, but everyone should know better than to obey the paper - the customs are just far better quality.

We can't tell you really sound wise and feel-wise because each individual gibson sounds and feels completely different even if it's the same model - the bound fretboard edges on the custom should feel a lot smoother than the studios though.. that's about the only objective difference i can think of in terms of feel. And of course, being a better quality guitar, the custom should give you a much better quality sound. But as i said - they all sound different anyway. If you're buying a gibson, try out a load of different ones, regardless of model or anything like that, and buy the individual guitar that you think suits you best - and if you can't find any to try.. well then.. just don't buy one
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#10
Studios are made out of lesser would and feel cheap. A high end Epiphone (Elitist) or an Edwards will a lot nicer than a Studio.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#11
Quote by MatrixClaw
Studios are made out of lesser would and feel cheap. A high end Epiphone (Elitist) or an Edwards will a lot nicer than a Studio.

I dunno, i've tried a few of these MIJs and i think they do outperform the gibson studios by a fair bit but somehow aren't so nice to hold - i actually like my gibson LP studio better than any of the MIJs i played even though it is a lesser guitar as such.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#12
Quote by Blompcube
I dunno, i've tried a few of these MIJs and i think they do outperform the gibson studios by a fair bit but somehow aren't so nice to hold - i actually like my gibson LP studio better than any of the MIJs i played even though it is a lesser guitar as such.



I had an Edwards and I thought it was better than every single Les Paul Standard they at Guitar Center

You probably prefer the thicker necks, most of the MIJs have a thinner neck, somewhere between a 50s and 60s.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#13
Quote by MatrixClaw


I had an Edwards and I thought it was better than every single Les Paul Standard they at Guitar Center

You probably prefer the thicker necks, most of the MIJs have a thinner neck, somewhere between a 50s and 60s.

It's the thinner necks and poly finish that turn me off them.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#14
Quote by MatrixClaw


I had an Edwards and I thought it was better than every single Les Paul Standard they at Guitar Center

You probably prefer the thicker necks, most of the MIJs have a thinner neck, somewhere between a 50s and 60s.

i do like thick necks, but my les paul has quite a thin neck for a les paul, which is closer to a '60s neck than a '50s neck - thinner than that of the burny SG i tried which i really liked.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#15
My doublecut actually has the thinniest neck out of all of my guitars...it's like holding a 2 by 4. i actually playing the neck on the r8. it does get exhausting after a while though. I wouldn't want to shred on it for hours. it would break my hand.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#17
Just holding them at a store is usually enough. Even without the chambering you can feel a difference.

Sonically they won't be worlds apart, though. There's a rather sharp drop in overall sound quality:price ratio as you go further and further up the pricing scale with any guitar gear.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#18
bubbs it's your party you can cry if you want to.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
Last edited by AcousticMirror at Jul 12, 2010,
#19
^ Shh. It's on the DL.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#20
Quote by MatrixClaw
Studios are made out of lesser would and feel cheap. A high end Epiphone (Elitist) or an Edwards will a lot nicer than a Studio.


Bullshit. I have a studio and my friend has a $3000 1968 les paul reissue from the 80s. They sound almost exactly the same. Actually, the studio had a fuller, rounder sound to it with slightly more bass response. The 1968 reissue had slightly more mids and treble, with a little less bass. Both could've been EQed to sound like one another.

So in all, there definately wasn't a $2000+ difference in tone. Not at all. I bet you that with different pickups and a maple cap, my studio (vintage mahogany) would've sounded identical to the reissue.
Gibson Les Paul Studio Vintage Mahagony - Cherry
Homemade EVH Black&White Frankenstrat
Marshall Vintage Modern 2466
Marshall 425B cab
EVH phase 90 + 117 Flanger, Dunlop Hendrix Fuzz Face + Crybaby 535Q, Boss DD-20, Hardwire Tube Overdrive
#21
Quote by rockfreak611
Bullshit. I have a studio and my friend has a $3000 1968 les paul reissue from the 80s. They sound almost exactly the same. Actually, the studio had a fuller, rounder sound to it with slightly more bass response. The 1968 reissue had slightly more mids and treble, with a little less bass. Both could've been EQed to sound like one another.

So in all, there definately wasn't a $2000+ difference in tone. Not at all. I bet you that with different pickups and a maple cap, my studio (vintage mahogany) would've sounded identical to the reissue.


nope you play an mg.
sorry. try again.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#22
Quote by rockfreak611
Bullshit. I have a studio and my friend has a $3000 1968 les paul reissue from the 80s. They sound almost exactly the same. Actually, the studio had a fuller, rounder sound to it with slightly more bass response. The 1968 reissue had slightly more mids and treble, with a little less bass. Both could've been EQed to sound like one another.

So in all, there definately wasn't a $2000+ difference in tone. Not at all. I bet you that with different pickups and a maple cap, my studio (vintage mahogany) would've sounded identical to the reissue.

Please refer to post #17.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.