#1
I am looking for advice and feed back on my goals and plans to achieve my goals. As well as advice regarding balancing my practice with other commitments etc.

Current skill level

Novice, I can play barre chords, open chords, intervals and a few triads that I know of. I have memorized the pentatonic, dorian and aeolian scales. Absolute beginner at arpeggios, can barely do hammer ons/pull offs. Just learned how to do pinch harmonics today.

As for alternate picking I can only play this about 80% speed, I'm not sure how much practice it will take to get the last 20%.


Goals

I am mainly interested it power metal/ neoclassical metal such as Ynwgie Malmsteen or Children of Bodom, instrumental rock such as Joe Satriani etc.

I want to develop the skills required to:
Play: canon rock
Play: Don't Say Lazy http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oq0uZq5oq2I
Play: Never Die, To The Moon - IRON ATTACK! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fh1uZtWq0H0
Play: Renaissance Affair - Leonardo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxrKuchuGqY
Play: Always with you, Always with me - Joe Satriani

I would like to achieve this level of aptitude within 3 years

Practice

I can currently dedicate 14 hours of focused practice per week (7-8 am and pm).
I am up to the end of stage two of Metal Method (been good for direction and short term goals).

Commitments

Study (42 hours/week)
Sports training (8-9 hours/week)
Travel (5 hours/week)

I have Saturday and Sunday off (unless I get behind in my studies and need to make up time).

Thanks.
Last edited by 03-13-2010 at Jul 11, 2010,
#2
I would like to achieve this level of aptitude within 3 years


that sounds reasonable


If your going for a neo classical type sound i would recommend learning the Harmonic minor scale and Phrygian mode

practice with a metronome to help with your speed
Last edited by Coagulation at Jul 11, 2010,
#4
i would just say keep learning new songs in the metal ish genre focus on matching the rhythm...(EVH has some good songs to learn)
the lead will come in time.. and for your triads and arpeggios work i would record you playing some basic chords and then you can practice arpeggios over them with ALL the root note positions(on all 6 strings)- this will really speed up your fret board knowledge... oh yea and ^ BFMV are heavy metal.
#5
So long as you keep your two hours per day focused on your goals, you should do just fine. I would recommend more practice if your muscles and joints are up to it.

And since you're interested in very demanding guitar styles, be sure to ALWAYS use a metronome of some sort.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#7
@Coagulation
Thanks, I have been trying to memorise a few scales/week so I'll give them a go as well.

@ibrahimasood
That was brilliant thanks a lot.

@elihu4321
Great idea my understanding of triads is in its infancy so I'll be working on this in the future.

@hockeyplayer168
Thanks, I'll take that to heart.

@MousseMoose
For a minute I thought I had not but sure enough the Ionian scale is the "major scale" which I have only played on one occasion. I'll definitely work on that one as well in future.

Regarding the use of a metronome, if I am practicing a bar or two of a song in a loop is it better to play along with guitar pro or just have a metronome playing?
#8
Quote by MousseMoose

Honesty, you are far from mastering guitar. Practicing just about anything would help you.


Hey man, give this guy a break!

We are all far from "mastering" the guitar.

TS is going to gain nothing from your criticism.

TS: If you're sure you can and are putting in that amount go for it!

Don't forget to spend a bit of time on things like aural training, and sight-reding. Equally important as technique (which is very important, don't get me wrong)
#9
Quote by 03-13-2010
@Coagulation
Thanks, I have been trying to memorise a few scales/week so I'll give them a go as well.

@ibrahimasood
That was brilliant thanks a lot.

@elihu4321
Great idea my understanding of triads is in its infancy so I'll be working on this in the future.

@hockeyplayer168
Thanks, I'll take that to heart.

@MousseMoose
For a minute I thought I had not but sure enough the Ionian scale is the "major scale" which I have only played on one occasion. I'll definitely work on that one as well in future.

Regarding the use of a metronome, if I am practicing a bar or two of a song in a loop is it better to play along with guitar pro or just have a metronome playing?

Just bear in mind that it's not all about playing.

Listening and understanding are just as important - the major scale for example. Simply learning where to play a scale teaches you very little, to get the most benefit out of it you also need to know what the scale actually is - how it's constructed, how it functions musically and ultimately how, why and when it can be used.

You don't need to memorise any more scales, that's just a waste of your time and won't benefit you one bit. Focus on understanding what you currently only know a little about. The major scale is the centre of everything, that needs to be what you concentrate on as far as theory goes.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Videos are a great way to learn.

14 hours a week of focused practice will do you a whole lotta good in the long run. I'd recommend picking up "Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar" if you want to learn some really effective practice methods.

Other than that, I'd recommend you set short term goals for yourself in terms of "practice X exercise for Y amount of time", with Y being equal to or greater than 45 minutes. You don't have to hit that exercise for the whole amount of time in one sitting - just chink away at it and eventually, you'll complete that goal and you will notice improvement in that particular area.

Also, don't forget to always target your weak areas and to pick exercises that help you in more ways than one. Practicing scales while naming the degree of each note you're playing will help you learn the fretboard really fast, plus you will be working on technique at the same time. Practicing scales using melodic patterns, like thirds, will also help you memorize the position faster, build more technique, and your ear will be able to recognize thirds played melodically.

Ya get me on this?
#11
Quote by STONESHAKER

Also, don't forget to always target your weak areas and to pick exercises that help you in more ways than one. Practicing scales while naming the degree of each note you're playing will help you learn the fretboard really fast, plus you will be working on technique at the same time. Practicing scales using melodic patterns, like thirds, will also help you memorize the position faster, build more technique, and your ear will be able to recognize thirds played melodically.

Ya get me on this?



good advice!

I've noticed that I've come a LONG way even for just playing a year. I went from being able to play open chords to looping in multiple rythm instances and playing leads alot easier.

one thing that I lack is finger picking, and like mentioned i try to work on it, and its progressing.

I've noticed that after ANY legth of time practicing any instrument, you get better. However to reach a good level, its going to take a long time. Then once you reach that point, be sure to keep up with it. Becuase of school I've not had time to practice piano as much as i once did. I went from playing lizst pieces to barely being able to sightread mid level sheet music. It's been a real bummer for me mostly becuase 14 years of practice disapeared pretty fast.
#12
That book I mentioned, "Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar" by Jamie Andreas actually contains several chapters on fingerpicking for classical guitar, so now you've got two reasons to read it. I found it very helpful even though I don't fingerpick too often.
#13
The pieces you stated you want to learn are VERY achievable within 3 years if you practice correctly. You need to focus practice and practice everything as slow as you need to to play it cleanly - let that be your base point. Also this would be a good time to get into Major scale theory - everything in music is based on or related to the major scale.

Always with me is quite easy to play aside from some of the fast legato runs - the main beef of it is relatively easy so i'd recommend learning some of the licks from that.

EDIT: Although The Principles of Correct Practice has some useful pointers for efficient practicing i'd take most of it with a pinch of salt - the guy that wrote it makes out like you'll never be any sort of musician unless you follow his advice to a tee, which is frankly just wrong.
Last edited by GilbertsPinky at Jul 13, 2010,
#14
Quote by GilbertsPinky

EDIT: Although The Principles of Correct Practice has some useful pointers for efficient practicing i'd take most of it with a pinch of salt - the guy that wrote it makes out like you'll never be any sort of musician unless you follow his advice to a tee, which is frankly just wrong.


/agree

He/she is a classical guitar teacher. I think that's to be expected. Still, lots of good advice in there that you can run with.
#15
@jesse music
I'll have to learn about this aural training. Sight reading is very daunting I'll have to read about how that is developed.

@steven seagull
I'll read up on major scale theory.

@STONESHAKER
Here is what I did this morning:

10 minute warm up
(2132-4320-3243-5430 ascending sequence 40 bpm)

5 minute 6 string barre chord strengthening
(moving up and down fret board trying to get each string to ring out gets sore pretty quick)

5 minute Hammer on exercise
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cf7OTbl__aU 40 bpm)

5 minute pull off
(same protocol as with hammer ons)

10 minute chords/strumming/palm muting
(practiced the chorus of "don't say lazy" three finger intervals at 47.5 bpm)
I need to do this slower so I get it 100%
Fingers became sore (probably from the hammer ons) so I did 10 instead of 15 minute.

10 minute Scales
(alternate picking ionian scale whilst saying notes 40 bpm

20 minute Sweep picking
(http://www.myguitarsolo.com/ch_arpeggio1.htm and the "don't say lazy" sweep http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/m/misc_cartoons/k-on_-_dont_say_lazy_guitar_pro.htm)

I went over time since I didn't want to stop playing the Sweep in the Don't say lazy tab, it is unfortunate that there is no guitar solo in the original song.

@GilbertsPinky
Even something as mind blowing as this:
Concerto Moon - To die for http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYEfFK6196E
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/m/misc_unsigned_bands/concerto_moon_-_to_die_for_guitar_pro.htm

btw are pinch harmonics used to make those squeals at 2:38 - 3:02?

Regarding classical guitar I am concerned that it would take time and effort away from becoming proficient in shredding, are my concerns unfounded?
Last edited by 03-13-2010 at Jul 15, 2010,