#1
Ok im really annoyed and I dont know if im missing something or what..im soloing in E lydian like I have the E lydian scale up and im soloing around there but my solo doesnt seem to be going anywhere like it all just kinda sounds the same, am i missing something? my progression is


E, F#/E

and im just soloing using e lydian scale
#3
Quote by pedrodaguitarra
F# being mixolydian right?

F# being the II of E Lydian.

Are you using different octaves? Are you utilizing different techniques? Are you adding extensions to the chord using your melody? Are you landing on chord tones? Are you landing on non-chord tones?

These are all things that will effect the sound of the solo you're playing.
#4
I just have the entire scale up of E LYDIAN all through the entire neck and just using the notes on there and it all sounds the same
#5
I repeat. Pay attention to what I'm saying. YOU have to give it drive and YOU have to make it want to move forward. It's not the modes fault (though the backing could be helping).

Just playing E Lydian up and down the neck will do nothing for you. Do the things I posed in the questions and you'll add at least a little bit.

Quote by DiminishedFifth
F# being the II of E Lydian.

Are you using different octaves? Are you utilizing different techniques? Are you adding extensions to the chord using your melody? Are you landing on chord tones? Are you landing on non-chord tones?

These are all things that will effect the sound of the solo you're playing.
#6
Quote by ShogunRonin
I just have the entire scale up of E LYDIAN all through the entire neck and just using the notes on there and it all sounds the same

If you just do that then 99 times out of a hundred you'll simply end up playing B major.

Modes are inherently "wrong" - they're harmonically unstable and don't resolve the way we're conditioned to expect things to. If you just stick a pattern in front of yourself and meander through it then it's not going to work because everything you've ever heard and experienced about music is going to pull you back to the relative major.

If you want to use modes then you have to do just that, USE them. Give yourself a suitable backing to establish a tonal centre then choose your notes accordingly. If you just try and "let it happen" then you'll just end up playing in the relative major because that's how your brain thinks music is supposed to sound.
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#7
Quote by ShogunRonin
Ok im really annoyed and I dont know if im missing something or what..im soloing in E lydian like I have the E lydian scale up and im soloing around there but my solo doesnt seem to be going anywhere like it all just kinda sounds the same, am i missing something? my progression is


E, F#/E

and im just soloing using e lydian scale


What you're missing is MUSIC.


A scale, whether you only know the pattern, or completely understand the theory behind its construction..... is just a scale.

So yes, you are missing something.
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by steven seagull
Modes are inherently "wrong" - they're harmonically unstable and don't resolve the way we're conditioned to expect things to. If you just stick a pattern in front of yourself and meander through it then it's not going to work because everything you've ever heard and experienced about music is going to pull you back to the relative major.
While I understand your point (that our ears are conditioned to major and minor keys, although more so major), I don't think modes are inherently unstable. Then again I guess that's easy for me to say since I've gradually come to "expect" major tonality less and less as I progress in my study of music. It just seems to me that most of the modes (apart from locrian, naturally, and maybe phrygian) seem pretty stable as long as you don't do anything drastically tonal.

For example, if you were to play D A G F# C B D it sounds pretty resolved on D and you'd be hard pressed to argue against calling that mixolydian (provided the D resolution).

Although, I guess you could argue that it's just D major with an accidental.

Quote by GuitarMunky
What you're missing is MUSIC.


A scale, whether you only know the pattern, or completely understand the theory behind its construction..... is just a scale.

So yes, you are missing something.
+1 to this. You can't just play a scale/mode/progression and expect it to sound good. You have to take it and make music out of it.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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