#1
hey, my bands recording our EP over the summer and i want to know where to start on this. what kind of recording gear will i need? what is some good software? and about how much it will cost us
#2
there are thousands of different set-ups and recording techniques you could use depending on the type of band, your budget and desired product- the information is out there, go research properly.

Look at TweakHeadz and Recording Review website.
#3
well im personally recording the guitar tracks but we are also doing drums and vocals.
budget wont be an issue sence we have 5 willing people to spend a decent amount of money
#4
Here's a perspective... If I were you, given what your goal is, I would take the five willing people, pool their money, and check into a project/demo studio and do it at least somewhat properly. Here's why....

1. How long did it take for you to become a guitarist capable of playing well enough to create something worthy of distributing to the public for money? Even a little bit... four years?

Well, think of a studio as your new instrument. Do you really want to spend four years learning your new instrument well enough to create something worthy of distributing to the public for money... even a little bit?

You will NOT NOT NOT get a good recording, even if you buy gear tomorrow and start learning right away, that will be of anything resembling EP quality before the end of summer.

2. Good studio gear is expensive. Especially if you're recording 8-16 tracks at a time with live drums, etc. If each of the five of you kicks in $300, and you get a free Reaper trial, you'll get a decent interface, a decent set of monitors and a SM57. You will still need more mics for your drums, and you still won't have a 'proper' vocal mic.

By comparison, that same $1500 will get you probably an entire week in a project studio with someone who already has the gear and knows how to use it.

3. Okay, despite my cautions of #1 and #2, you still decide to go through with it. You will spend hours and hours and months and months on a learning curve that will make your head spin. But at what cost? What is it that you do now that you are going to give up in order to make that time? Play less guitar? Write fewer songs? That's what happened to me. I set the guitar aside for about ten years while I learned how to record. What will you set aside in order to commit to your new instrument? Remember, a half-assed effort at anything will give you only half-assed results.

4. And, continuing with the idea..... five people all kick in for the gear. Who owns it? What happens when your bass player quits? What happens when the band decides to break up?

5. So, you've got #4 sorted out.... get ready for a gear-slut ride. You will always be on the lookout for more mics, blah, blah, blah. What is it now that you are prepared NOT to spend money on so you can buy recording gear instead?

Now, I'm not trying to dissuade you from recording. I love it. But... many people get into it without an accurate perspective on what they're getting into. I know. It happened to me. "Hey, I'm going to get this Cubase, and for $500, I can have a pro studio in my house!" If I only knew!

If you want to get into recording with this perspective, then awesome. If you just want to make an EP by the end of the summer or by the end of the year.... think twice.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Quote by axemanchris
Here's a perspective... If I were you, given what your goal is, I would take the five willing people, pool their money, and check into a project/demo studio and do it at least somewhat properly. Here's why....

1. How long did it take for you to become a guitarist capable of playing well enough to create something worthy of distributing to the public for money? Even a little bit... four years?

Well, think of a studio as your new instrument. Do you really want to spend four years learning your new instrument well enough to create something worthy of distributing to the public for money... even a little bit?

You will NOT NOT NOT get a good recording, even if you buy gear tomorrow and start learning right away, that will be of anything resembling EP quality before the end of summer.

2. Good studio gear is expensive. Especially if you're recording 8-16 tracks at a time with live drums, etc. If each of the five of you kicks in $300, and you get a free Reaper trial, you'll get a decent interface, a decent set of monitors and a SM57. You will still need more mics for your drums, and you still won't have a 'proper' vocal mic.

By comparison, that same $1500 will get you probably an entire week in a project studio with someone who already has the gear and knows how to use it.

3. Okay, despite my cautions of #1 and #2, you still decide to go through with it. You will spend hours and hours and months and months on a learning curve that will make your head spin. But at what cost? What is it that you do now that you are going to give up in order to make that time? Play less guitar? Write fewer songs? That's what happened to me. I set the guitar aside for about ten years while I learned how to record. What will you set aside in order to commit to your new instrument? Remember, a half-assed effort at anything will give you only half-assed results.

4. And, continuing with the idea..... five people all kick in for the gear. Who owns it? What happens when your bass player quits? What happens when the band decides to break up?

5. So, you've got #4 sorted out.... get ready for a gear-slut ride. You will always be on the lookout for more mics, blah, blah, blah. What is it now that you are prepared NOT to spend money on so you can buy recording gear instead?

Now, I'm not trying to dissuade you from recording. I love it. But... many people get into it without an accurate perspective on what they're getting into. I know. It happened to me. "Hey, I'm going to get this Cubase, and for $500, I can have a pro studio in my house!" If I only knew!

If you want to get into recording with this perspective, then awesome. If you just want to make an EP by the end of the summer or by the end of the year.... think twice.

CT


Thank you so much. This is a great post, I can't thank you enough! I am going to look into studio time right now, you post makes a lot of sense and is really helpful
#6
Glad I could be of help.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.