#1
I took my much loved sg2000 into mansons guitar shop uk,
widely respected shop etc.
the adjusted the truss rod and performed a set up, now every time I bend
a note my finger slips over the string onto the next.
I have played guitar many years, but have spent all my time playing not
learning how to set up the instrument so whats up, action too low, too high ?
frets too worn ?
#2
My guess is that the action is too low.
If not maybe they changed your strings without telling you, and they put on strings that are lighter then what you're used to.
Quote by L2112Lif
I put a ton of my capital into SW Airlines... The next day, THE NEXT DAY these nutters fly into the WTC. What the hell? Apparently no one wanted to fly anymore, and I was like "What gives? God damnit Osama, let me win a fuggin' game!"
#3
Quote by IRISH_PUNK13
My guess is that the action is too low.
If not maybe they changed your strings without telling you, and they put on strings that are lighter then what you're used to.

this - unless you specify otherwise, generally shops assume you want the lowest possible action.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#4
Aside from action issues which could be the problem. Another thing could be the neck relief. Neck relief is the straightness of the neck.

My guitars don't have perfectly straight necks there is slight bowing. and it feels strange to play on guitars with straight necks as well as guitars whose necks are bowed more than I am use too.

The issue could be something similar.

Also if they replaced the strings to a different gauge you are use too it could make you slip bends.
#5
It could also be that they set it up properly and adjusted the truss rod to "correct" specs, but you were used to playing on an incorrectly setup guitar, so it feels very different.
Quote by Kensai
Please, I eat gays for breakfast...

Quote by Kensai
I must be even further in the closet then
#6
how a guitar is setup is down to player to specify, maybe now the guitar is setup differently/ perhaps to manufacturer specs it may highlight areas in technique that you might of been struggling with and they now become easier, and bending is now something you have to relearn.
#7
Quote by Blompcube
this - unless you specify otherwise, generally shops assume you want the lowest possible action.
Exactly the problem. This is why I stopped taking my guitars to shops until I figured out exactly what action I wanted and could tell them, because if I didn't they would set the action very low and I had the same problem as OP, my fingers would slip over a string I was bending and hit the next one up.

For a quick fix, raise your string height. Go a little at a time, try to stop the second it gets back to being comfortable for you and go no higher. Carefully measure the action and from now on if you ever take your guitar to be set up by a store, quote that measurement so they don't set the action too low again.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#8
Can i get a small explanation for this?

if you have a high action and bend, the string is depressed down to the fretboard making the action Zero anyways

high action > to flat
lower action > to flat

both situations still end to touching the fretboard

or is the slipping referenced to the string not being bent but to the string to the side of the bent string...?
#9
It's the string above the one you're bending. As you bend a string upwards, your fingers contact the next string up and with low action it is very easy to slip from one string to the other, regardless of how much pressure you apply.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#10
Well a couple of months on and Ive gotten used to playing it.... i think it's just that the set up was so f****ed and I was used to playing it with quite a bent neck