#1
Should I be able to play a solo decently before I tackle improvisation?

I'm starting to try improvising seriously, and know a bit of theory, but I feel like it's a bit pointless, at least until I can play a good solo. Seems like I have enough knowledge, but the technic isn't there just yet.
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a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#2
Pick out the techniques (there's some very common, generic techniques/riffs or minor variations of them in a lot of solos) and practice them slowly, gradually building speed. Learn parts of solos that you can play and keep trying to nail the difficult parts.

There's no reason not to improvise, but you can't really spend all your time doing it and expect things to come to you any time soon. Split some time between dedicated practice of riffs from solos you enjoy (I'm not talking sweeping and all that good stuff, I'm talking techniques that you absolutely must have) and improvisation.

I'm definitely not going to say you shouldn't improvise Everyone should improvise often.
#3
Well, I've been trying the Paranoid solo. The start of it I find quite easy, not at full speed, but since it's slower I can play it to a decent tempo. I'm trying to practice my bending technique, and that part of the solo I think is good, since there's only like 2 of them in there.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#4
I think it's kind of a yes and no answer really, when you're learning a solo it's important to look at how everything connects and what techniques are used etc.... so that when you come to create your own solo you have ideas in your head of how to make it as awesome as possible, but if there are parts of a certain solo that you feel are beyond your ability, just practise the certain lick slowly for a while until you feel comfortable with it, then try incorporating it into your own improvisation, then you should be able to play the solo you were learning easier and with more confidence, hope that helped
#5
Quote by Spike6sic6
Should I be able to play a solo decently before I tackle improvisation?

I'm starting to try improvising seriously, and know a bit of theory, but I feel like it's a bit pointless, at least until I can play a good solo. Seems like I have enough knowledge, but the technic isn't there just yet.


yes, it's crucial. Learn alot of them.

Learn them all the way through....memorize them.

Listen......absorb..... enjoy.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 12, 2010,
#7
It's a chicken-or-egg scenario. Without understanding, you struggle to write or improvise something meaningful. Without skill, you struggle to apply what you understand.

So, I guess it's better to develop both so neither exists in a vacuum, it also motivates and accelerates the learning process if you can see things in a bigger picture rather than just one detail of the music.

Also, since both music theory or understanding (intelectual / emotional) and technique (dexterity and muscle memory) are different areas, it's in itself a good idea to spread it.
The thing with trying to learn something is that time has diminishing returns.. there is a point at wich putting in more hours into nailing a technique or reading up on stuff is only effective in draining your energy. It's much more effective to put your time in different areas each day rather than all your time focusing on one thing.
#8
When I first started learning, my teacher started me off on improvising as soon as I could play a blues scale on one string. It was fun. Didn't actually learn to play a solo note-for-note for quite a while afterwards.
#9
Should you read a few books before trying to write a novel?

It's probably going to help a bit.
Actually called Mark!

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