#1
whats the most effective way to see good results? just playing the scale doesnt seem to be the way to practice
#3
Pick two notes from your scale, let's say A and A#. Stick to those two notes and find as many different ways to play them as possible. For example:

Quickly play A#, then pull off to A and bend to A# again.
Trill the notes.
Bend between them.
Prebend the string and release it from A# to A.
Just play A and explore many different ways to vibrate it.
Slide from A to A#.
Slide from A to A# and pull off to A.
Play A, tap A an octave higher and bend it to A#.


Et cetera. It's a matter of exploration. Find as many different ways to play the same note; stick to the one (or two) notes and play it as many ways as you possibly can. Explore and have fun, see just how many different sounds you can make from just the same one or two notes.
#4
Well try playing the scale first backwards and forwards

then start switching direction on random notes,

then start skipping random notes while going forward and back wards on the scale,

then start bending and holding random notes for different lengths of times.

Be certain to use a metronome.

It may sound like disarray at first but it works.
#6
Quote by Axim Bassist
Well try playing the scale first backwards and forwards

then start switching direction on random notes,

then start skipping random notes while going forward and back wards on the scale,

then start bending and holding random notes for different lengths of times.

Be certain to use a metronome.

It may sound like disarray at first but it works.

That's exactly what you shouldn't do.

TS, start thinking....start thinking about what it is you actualyl want your instrument to say as opposed to simply moving your fingers and hoping for the best.
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#7
Quote by steven seagull
TS, start thinking

I'd take that even a step further, start talking. Then take the rhythm of your speech and play it.
#8
Quote by mangoman13
whats the most effective way to see good results? just playing the scale doesnt seem to be the way to practice


1) learn what a phrase is

2) be able to aurally recognize phrases in existing music

3) practice writing and playing musical phrases on your guitar

4) practice improvising phrases on your guitar
shred is gaudy music
#9
I remember seeing a video of Paul Gilbert talking about phrasing. He said he thinks of it from a drummer perspective, and finds all the different rhythms. Ex: Straight quarter notes, Straight eighth notes, Two quarter notes and four eighth notes, etc.
#10
take a melodic phrase...four notes...the beatles "good day sunshine" comes to mind..play it in key...play it in all octaves..move it in minor thirds then the circle of fifths/fourths...and of course in all keys...

now try and incorporate it in a solo..change the rhythm of the phrase also to vary it...

do this with as many phrases as you can ....then link them together and try creating your own..
#11
Well, your phrasing consists of a couple things.
- Note selection
- Rhythmic units
- Articulation techniques

The way you combine these three things will determine how good your phrasing is. Before we go further, think of a couple of your favorite guitarists.

Note selection: Look at a couple licks by your favorite guitarists. What notes is he emphasizing in each lick relative to the scale? For instance, B.B. King likes to emphasize the VI in a lot of his licks. Of course, this will depend what chords you are playing the lick over, so figure that out too.

Rhythmic units: This is a simple exercise I got from Peter Fischer's Rock Guitar Secrets. Set your metronome to 60 BPM. Now, start playing whatever melodies or scales you want, but just with whole notes. After doing that for a few measures, start switching between whole notes and half notes, then half notes and quarter notes, then quarter notes and eighth notes, then eighth notes and eighth note triplets, etc. up to sixteenth note sextuplets. This will note only improve your chops, but you will be much more comfortable using a variety of rhythmic units in your soloing, thus improving your phrasing.

also: you can use this exercise to practice your strumming too. Works very well.

Articulation techniques: this should be really easy for you to pick out. Buddy Guy and B.B. King like to bend strings. Delve deeper though. Listen to Buddy Guy's "I Smell a Rat". Towards the end of the introduction solo, you'll hear him bend up a perfect fourth (that's 5 ****ing frets!!), reverse bend back down from there, then reverse bend back down while hitting each note chromatically. BB doesn't really do this sort of extreme bending - he is a bit more laid back.

Another quick example: Van Halen and Randy Rhoads like to use two-handed legato licks. Listen to the first part of the Crazy Train solo, then listen to the end of Eruption where Eddie starts tapping arpeggios on a single string. You will notice that Randy's legato lines are much more bubbly since he's trilling the two lowest notes of the triplet, whereas Eddie is playing them in a more linear sequence.

Now go work on your phrasing.
#12
I write a chord progression in guitar pro, and improvise over it. Trying to play the same progression and make it sound differently really helps my phrasing.
#13
The number of ways to learn and practice phrasing differs from one person to the next. Its your musical voice, figure it out. Sometimes its the struggle that builds the strength that results.

But you might start experimenting with a cycle of melodic patterns. Find things that speak to you.

Not long ago I recommended that one of our advanced students stop starting their leads on a root, and do something else, like a 9th or 11th and see where it takes their musical ears from there. Their phrasing and note choices that followed got a lot less predictable and more interesting.
#14
Switch to using some kind of template system for the web pages and leave it up to individuals to customize it as they see fit. So in this video we're going to be continuing our conversation about how to think about scratch phrases. So again, it's most important that when you are scratching.


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#15
Watch this video.
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#16
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Watch this video.



^ That's a good exercise.

take any phrase.... borrow it rhythmically..... make your own melody.

then your dealing with actual phrases. Exactly what the TS needs.


that was a good link to post.
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#17
Play a melody. Now play it on your guitar like how you would sing it. Make your guitar breathe. You can imitate the breathing by using a tiny amount of dimnuendo. Then crescendo into to the next phrase for a smooth transition(Keep in mind it is not the only way to it). Then you can add all sorts of expressive tecniques and accents to it to spice it up. But Just focus on getting the first part right firs.t