#1
so i bought a cheap adapter that has a little pot on the back that lets you choose from either 3, 4.5, 5, 6, 7.5, 9 or 12 volts.
I have 4 q's:

1. will this cheap adapter (like 9) cause more unwanted noise through the amp than a more expensive adapter?

2. if so, is there anyway to reduce the noise?

3. are adapters more or less noisy/better sounding than batteries?

4. if an fx pedal has 9v input will i be able to emulate the sound of dying batteries if i set the adapter to 7.5volts?
#2
1. Ive never heard unwanted noise caused by my cheap adapter, but i'm not sure if there isn't unwanted noise in other cases (maybe it also depends on the pedal's build)

2. Noise-gate pedal i guess

3. I read somewhere that batteries are better, but you have to replace them from time to time which i find annoying.

4. Not sure, but to prevent malfunctioning i just rather use 9v, but there's a pedal made by Death By Audio that has a 'low-battery' effect. the supersonic fuzz-gun: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqJa1fzv_Ew apparently the 'Bias' knob does this, it changes the voltage.
#3
I'll sell you one... seriously. No c'mon, why'd I be? No really I will sell yo-fuck it you don't want one? What you want it now fine. So, yeah I'll sell you one.
#4
Quote by BabyWantABottle
I'll sell you one... seriously. No c'mon, why'd I be? No really I will sell yo-fuck it you don't want one? What you want it now fine. So, yeah I'll sell you one.


Im tempted to report that as a bad post...
#5
As far as you are asking,

Batteries are the least noisy way to power effects pedals as they are all isolated and do not produce interference. I don't know if the lower quality adapter will cause noise, as I've never used anything but the adapter that I built myself.

Changing the voltage is a way to simulate a dying battery though (All of the outputs on my pedal power supply have variable voltage output), the thing you have to watch out for is if you have a digital pedal. A digital pedal will not like having a lower voltage much, as many digital items will just shut off once their voltage drops below a certain level.
#6
cheaper adapters sometimes have really low quality filtering which can add noise with some pedals
just try it out though..as long as it's set for 9v, the worst that happens is it's a little noisier
#7
Quote by Ma-hog!

1. will this cheap adapter (like 9) cause more unwanted noise through the amp than a more expensive adapter?
2. if so, is there anyway to reduce the noise?
3. are adapters more or less noisy/better sounding than batteries?
4. if an fx pedal has 9v input will i be able to emulate the sound of dying batteries if i set the adapter to 7.5volts?


1. It might or it might not, it depends on how good of filtering it has and we can't know that for sure unless we have the adapter.

2. There are methods to reduce this noise but it's not very cost effective or anything because you'd just be adding some filtering into the circuit and/or shielding things. It'd be way easier just to get another adapter that doesn't sound bad.

3. Some adapters can sound as good as batteries. Some can sound worse. It depends on what you get.

4. Yes you could run the pedal on 7.5v and make it sound like the batteries were dying.


Before you get anything else though, try the adapter and see if it actually sounds bad because it sounds like you haven't tried it yet.
"Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you." - Aldous Huxley
#8
2. all you'd have to do is solder a bigger cap across the current one. not hard or expensive.

3. batteries are "better" because there is no chance of noise. the noise you hear in a cheap power supply is called ripple. batteries never have ripple bacause they are a combination of chemicals that create a voltage at the battery terminals. here's a quick explanation.

if you rectfiy 9v AC into DC and dont filter it (or poorly filter it), it will hum like a tree full of bees because of the waveform rising to 9v rms and falling to 0v so many times a second, depending on your line frequency.

caps are used to smooth out the ripple. you can never get the waveform into a straight line (like a battery would be) because caps arent infinitely large, so you calculate how much ripple can be tolerated and aim for a little better to get the ripple to an inaudible level. the more current you draw from the supply, the bigger the cap needs to be to keep up.

having said all that, a properly filtered power supply sounds no different than a battery. if yours is too noisy, strap a bigger cap across the output of the supply.

in order to take a wall wart case apart without destroying it, get a large flathead screwdriver and wedge it into the seam of the case and turn it like you were turning a screw. work your way around the case and it will eventually pop right off.
#9
Quote by Zamorak

Before you get anything else though, try the adapter and see if it actually sounds bad because it sounds like you haven't tried it yet.


oh no, i do have the adapter it just seems a lil noisier than a battery, in face when the pedal is in the fx loop and its off there is still a hum then when i turn the pedal on the pitch of the hum rises !
#10
Quote by Invader Jim
2. all you'd have to do is solder a bigger cap across the current one. not hard or expensive.

3. batteries are "better" because there is no chance of noise. the noise you hear in a cheap power supply is called ripple. batteries never have ripple bacause they are a combination of chemicals that create a voltage at the battery terminals. here's a quick explanation.

if you rectfiy 9v AC into DC and dont filter it (or poorly filter it), it will hum like a tree full of bees because of the waveform rising to 9v rms and falling to 0v so many times a second, depending on your line frequency.

caps are used to smooth out the ripple. you can never get the waveform into a straight line (like a battery would be) because caps arent infinitely large, so you calculate how much ripple can be tolerated and aim for a little better to get the ripple to an inaudible level. the more current you draw from the supply, the bigger the cap needs to be to keep up.

having said all that, a properly filtered power supply sounds no different than a battery. if yours is too noisy, strap a bigger cap across the output of the supply.

in order to take a wall wart case apart without destroying it, get a large flathead screwdriver and wedge it into the seam of the case and turn it like you were turning a screw. work your way around the case and it will eventually pop right off.


but if im not mistaken (which i probably am) my adapter generates no heat whatsoever and it has the ability to put out multiple voltages which makes it electronic right?
so doesnt that make it regulated? and if it was regulated wouldnt it already be quite as it can be?
#11
regulation ≠ filtering

Those types of supplies are rather cheap so it may or may not be filtered very well. it is NOT regulated. not in the least. also, it does generate heat. you just cant feel it. all electrical loads give off some amount of heat.

i dont know where you got the discussion of heat and whether or not it is electronic. those points are irrelevant. ffr, electronic means it has some sort of evacuated or gas-filled tube (like a flourescent light or vacuum tube) or a transistor. this power supply is not electronic.

regardless, whether it generates heat or is electronic is irrelevant.
#12
Quote by Invader Jim
regulation ≠ filtering

Those types of supplies are rather cheap so it may or may not be filtered very well. it is NOT regulated. not in the least. also, it does generate heat. you just cant feel it. all electrical loads give off some amount of heat.

i dont know where you got the discussion of heat and whether or not it is electronic. those points are irrelevant. ffr, electronic means it has some sort of evacuated or gas-filled tube (like a flourescent light or vacuum tube) or a transistor. this power supply is not electronic.

regardless, whether it generates heat or is electronic is irrelevant.


well Waldo to you sir!
#13
i use a 1 spot and have no issues. my friend who gigs 2-3 times a week uses the same 1 spot kit with up to 5-6 pedals including sometimes a digitech whammy (ie- big powerful pedals) and he has no issues.

1 spots are the most cost effective thing you can buy.

sure a brick or something is better, but unless your recording and have like 20 pedals in your board....why? i would say if you can max out a 1 spot (ie- more than about 8 pedals) then get a brick. if not a 1 spot should be fine.

if you have LARGE pedals, like huge whammys, line 6 delay modulators and big exspensive stuff that require more power a brich might be needed. but normal stomp boxes? 1 spot.
#14
I don't know if this has been said before:
4.
Make sure the pedal you are doing this to is not digital. If It is, you're risking the chance of pedal ****upedness.
If you want a Voltage Sagger, go to BeavisAudio.com
They have a schematic for one. About the easiest thing you can make for guitar.
..I was watching my death.
#15
if its a digital pedal it'll just sound like crap at a sagged voltage. keep lowering the voltagew and it'll just shut off. it wont damage anything.

the switch on that power supply works just as well as the beavis audio method in a pinch. i guess a pot would be better now that i think about it. ive built pedals that sound fine at full voltage, then as you sag it starts sounding worse, then sometimes theres a sweet spot.