#1
Hello all, long time lurker first time poster here

Im an acoustic guitarist of ten years and latley i've been delving into the world of jazz.

Im having a bit of bother finding a suitable scale to work around a song i've written, so i thought i'd drop by and see if any one here can help, seeing as this is my no1 guitar resource site..

Anyway, the progression is played with a gypsy rag style stum and goes as such..

D6/9 ..&2&3&4 Dadd9b5 ..&2&3&4 A7 (walk up) ..&2&3&4 D6/9 ..1&2 A7 ..3&4


Can anyone point me in the right direction?

Any help appreciated.

Edit: Sorry about the vague timing descriptions.
Last edited by conorkelly1982 at Jul 13, 2010,
#3
First of all congratulations on your post, it's good to know it was to seek for help .

Have you tried to use some kind of diminished chord in those &1&2&3&4?

EDIT: sorry, had no time to write more. I'll explain this now.

You strum a chord, and then make 4 minor triads going up the fretboard. This creates instability (since these are dominants and sub dominants), which will lead to people to gain interest over that lick. After that diminished triad lick, you recover stability by struming the next chord. Get it?
Last edited by Baraga at Jul 13, 2010,
#4
Quote by Baraga
First of all congratulations on your post, it's good to know it was to seek for help .

Have you tried to use some kind of diminished chord in those &1&2&3&4?

EDIT: sorry, had no time to write more. I'll explain this now.

You strum a chord, and then make 4 minor triads going up the fretboard. This creates instability (since these are dominants and sub dominants), which will lead to people to gain interest over that lick. After that diminished triad lick, you recover stability by struming the next chord. Get it?



Firstly thanks for the reply, I appreciate it.

On your point that i've highlighted, the A7 progression 'walks up' Through A7-Bmaug5-Adim-C#maug5. I play the last three chords as triads and the A7 as a quad. Is this an example of what you have described?
#5
Quote by MapOfYourHead
It's not really about what scale you use.

Use of syncopation and accidentals based around the chord tones of the underlying chord is a more apt approach.

This thread has some stuff.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1290210&highlight=mapofyourhead



Thanks, i'd best get reading

I think i'd need to brush up on my music terminology too by the looks of it
#6
Quote by conorkelly1982
Firstly thanks for the reply, I appreciate it.

On your point that i've highlighted, the A7 progression 'walks up' Through A7-Bmaug5-Adim-C#maug5. I play the last three chords as triads and the A7 as a quad. Is this an example of what you have described?



Yes, but I made a mistake. I didn't mean to say minor triads, I meant diminished triads to create instability.
#8
Quote by slayerfrk
C#minaug5? isnt that the same as Amaj first inversion?
same with Bmaug5 its a Gmajor first inversion. or am i crazy?


well, first, you wouldn't really see the notation "maug" or "minaug". far more likely you'll see it as some kind of alteration, i.e. C#m(#5) or C#min(#5). i myself prefer the former, so that's what i'll use.

granted the voicings are the same, then yes, C#m(#5) will sound the same as Amaj (6), and Bm(#5) will sound the same as Gmaj (6). but the notes they contain, though sounding the same, are different:

C#m(#5): C# E Gx
Amaj: C# E A
Bm(#5): B D Fx
Gmaj: B D G

the notes Gx and A, as well as Fx and G, sound the same, but they're different notes written on paper. in this regard, suffice it to say that, no, they are not the same chords.

EDIT:

now that i analyze the context, TS, i'd say that you're not using C#m(#5) and Bm(#5) at all -- you're using precisely the chords slayer suggested. this makes more sense -- you have three chords based on an A and that fourth chord actually goes down to a G (even though the bass walks up).

remember, you don't always name a chord according to its bass note. that's what inversions are for. but to indicate the bass note via inversion, you must first know what the root is. in nomenclature, the root is usually more important than the bass.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jul 13, 2010,