#1
Hi uhm so before i start i have a good understanding on keys, scales (3notes perstring system) and stuff, but i decided to learn arpeggios so i tried the CAGED system but i cant seem to apply this to songs. Lets say for example my song is in the key of C and my chord porgression is C- Am- Dm- G so how can i try doing a few arpeggios while applying the CAGED system? thanks if you can answer my question even if it seems a bit confusing
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#2
It's not really something you "apply to songs", it's just a way of formalising the relationship between chord shapes and scale patterns so they're a bit easier to remember.
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#3
i see but can i also like use that pattern for that chord shape so it would sound cooler?
Whoever said the telecasters were only made for country deserves a banjo slapping.
Rick_Diculous wrote:

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#4
They're just the "normal" chord shapes, C A G E and D...hence "CAGED". It's just showing you how those chord shapes relate to scale patterns, it's not a case of "cooler"...what you do with that knowledge is up to you.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
CAGED is the logic of the fretboard. You can not play anything that can't be related to CAGED in one or two way, or more sometimes.

CAGED IS NOT MUSIC THEORY it is the logic of the fretboard, or the logic of of how the instrument is mapped out.

Once you understand that you can understand CAGED to it fullest by relating the things you are playing to how they are logically mapped out on the instrument.

Now with that I have some premade write ups that might help you with your question.

-----------------------------------------

I have a quick primer/introduction to CAGED at my lesson forum: http://mikedodge.freeforums.org/the-caged-method-and-organizing-the-fretboard-t7.html if anyone's interested.

I figured CAGED out before I knew it's name. It came natural after trying to play chords in all area's of the fretboard. It wasn't until a Joe Pass article or video or something years later that I found out it was a 'method'. He was the first guy who I heard use the term.

It's a great method and I use it constantly. It logically shows you the strength of the fretboard as an entity or as a tool of it's own. The 'toolness' of it almost goes beyond the note naming/theory thing because the fretboard is your physical instrument.

CAGED is great but...

it's the fragments of the CAGED chords that are at the heart of some of the greatest guitar riffs to date. Keith Richards, Jimi Hendrix, Page, Eagles, Steven Stills, etc, etc...and etc, etc...IOW just about everybody...use small 2-4 string fragments of the CAGED forms to base a bulk of their styles around.

I'm not saying they knew or didn't know CAGED, or that these chords aren't groups of intervals or anything, but the ability CAGED gives you for playing all your chords in one spot of the neck creates chord 'movements' more so than chord "changes". Mainly because many chords that go together in rock music only have a note or two that changes while other notes don;t change and are common between the chords. It makes your next chord seem or feel like it's nothing but notes 'hanging off' the chord you're on.

The Richards C->F->C thing is a great example:

E------------
B---5--6--5-----
G---5--5--5-----
D---5--7--5-----
A------------
E------------

Think of that as a 'grip' or a 'move'. Two notes change but one note stays the same between the two chords. Now, move this around the fretboard and play it all over and you can't help but run into a classic Richards riff!

I use it a lot in the band I'm in where I seem to fill the roll of a piano player style more than a guitar style...and CAGED is prefect for this...

many of us have watch piano players playing chords and it looks like they are only moving a finger or two from the chord they are on to get to the next chord...it's because they ONLY change the notes that NEED to change to make one chord into the next chord.

Here's something I do all the time that can be pointed back to CAGED, I'll use a C-Am-F-G progression for example, a common I-iv-IV-V. Using the power of the fretboard I can make 'movements' instead of 'chords' really, or make nice voice-leading from chord to chord...I'm only change what I need to and it makes things sound like they are glued together nicely:


    C  Am F  G
E--------------
B---5--5--6--8-
G---5--5--5--7-
D---5--7--7--9-
A---------------
E---------------

    C   Am  F   G
E-------------------
B---8---10--10--12--
G---9---9---10--12--
D---10--10--10--12--
A-------------------
E-------------------



Sure these forms are all intervals and chords but CAGED is a great 'method' for knowing the fretboard in and out.
#6
Here's more examples in tunes...

Those Stones tune are always using the A or G form and the C form. Here's Start Me Up:


   C   F  F
E-----------
B--5---6--6----
G--5---5--5---
D--5---7--7----
A-----------
E------------


The C chord could be a fragment of an A form or a G form, but since it's played with the first finger we'll say G form.

The F chord is a fragment of the C form.

Some people really think their are only TWO forms to CAGED because of the csimilarities between the fingerings.

But...

Under The Bridge by RHCP uses a full blown C form for an Eb chord if I recall correctly.

Mary Jane's Last Dance uses a descenting line of CAGED fragments in the chorus:


   A   A   A    A
E----------------
B--2---5---10---14------
G--2---6---9----14-----
D--2---7---11---14-------
A--0---0---0----0--------
E-------------------- 


You get the idea real quick that it's the fragments of CAGED that get used a TON more than the full chord.


A good application or example of CAGED is a simple C-Am-F-G progression. You can play this with out a whole lot of movement, AND is shows you specifically, and more importantly, exactly what changes from chord to chord. Check this:


     C       Am       F        G
E--------|--------|--------|--------|
B----8---|---10---|---10---|---12---|
G----9---|----9---|---10---|---12---|
D---10---|---10---|---10---|---12---|
A--------|--------|--------|--------|
E--------|--------|--------|--------|
#7
Mike, that was a very helpful post which I have personally gained a lot from, so thanks

Paul