#1
I'm starting to learn chord and soloing/improvisation.

I watched Marty Friedman's melodic control video. and I figured a way I could start practicing. Basicly I start making a chord progression; let's make it simple and make it Am Em(key of A minor). Then I figure out the notes in the chords(A C E, E G B). Then I'd start soloing slow using only the notes contained within the chord.

So say the chord is Am, I'd start on A, using A C E, and when the Em come around I start on E and play along with G and B. Once I get confortable with making a good melody/phrasing, I'll start experimenting with notes outside the chords but contained within the key, trying to use more "complex" chords like maj7's, diminished, etc.

So is this a good way of starting out? Or is there something I'm missing.
Quote by MH400
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#2
No. You're limiting yourself. In my opinion you should only go back to this type of improvisation once you've exhausted licks in a key and you want to try and mix it up/create new rhythms and stuff. If you're just starting you might as well use all the notes available to you.
#3
Quote by GilbertsPinky
No. You're limiting yourself. In my opinion you should only go back to this type of improvisation once you've exhausted licks in a key and you want to try and mix it up/create new rhythms and stuff. If you're just starting you might as well use all the notes available to you.


if you get to the point where you have to exhaust licks in a key, then you're limiting yourself.

TS, you're basically on the right track, but don't limit yourself to the notes in the chord. play within the key emphasizing chord tones.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
Quote by AeolianWolf
if you get to the point where you have to exhaust licks in a key, then you're limiting yourself.

TS, you're basically on the right track, but don't limit yourself to the notes in the chord. play within the key emphasizing chord tones.

Uhm...no. You're always going to need to keep your ideas fresh and inspired...most people will end up playing most of the same licks, it's just a fact that most people stick to what they know, which is why the majority of guitarists don't have a huge arsenal of licks.

The very fact that improvisation is about expressing yourself means that sticking to three notes for your improvisation is limiting. I'm sorry if that wasn't clear to you, but that's what i meant.
#5
It's just that whenever I try improvising say in Eminor pentatonic, I always end up using all notes one after the other and it just sounds like a scale, if that makes any sense.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#6
Well then it's not the amount of notes you're using that is the problem - it's the rhythm, dynamics, phrasing.

Try mixing it up with your backing tracks, learn arpeggios and throw them into the mix. Try making up random rhythmic phrases and then playing them back on your guitar. You've gotta experiment, as if you're talking. You don't want to be just 'talking' up and down at a constant pace, you want highs, lows, screams, growls, softness etc...

There are half bends, whole bends, tone+half bends, slow vibrato, quick vibrato, vibrato added to an already bent note, chromatic runs, hammers, pulls, strick alternate picking, palm muted notes, legato, quarter notes, triplets, odd rhythmic groupings....there's so much you can do to spice up your playing. Look up Paul Gilberts lessons on youtube.
#8
Limiting yourseklf to just 3 notes may actually be a good thing, it allows you to be a little more creative, and focus on the phrasing rather than on notes.
#9
Quote by GilbertsPinky
Uhm...no. You're always going to need to keep your ideas fresh and inspired...most people will end up playing most of the same licks, it's just a fact that most people stick to what they know, which is why the majority of guitarists don't have a huge arsenal of licks.

The very fact that improvisation is about expressing yourself means that sticking to three notes for your improvisation is limiting. I'm sorry if that wasn't clear to you, but that's what i meant.


oh, i see. i thought you were telling him not to worry about chord tones and just play licks like 70% of guitarists would do.

i still disagree that he should stay within the confines of transposed licks. TS, learn to develop your own melodic voice and style. learn to develop your phrasing. train your ear and learn to hear what you play before you play it. you're only going to get so far playing three notes, so i really suggest playing in key and emphasizing chord tones. for a good exercise, though, try limiting yourself to playing only chord tones, and focus on some of the things gilbertspinky said in his most recent post. watch your rhythm. pay attention to your phrasing. pay attention to dynamics (this one is very important; many, many guitarists don't know how to control dynamics effectively).

utilize some of the techniques gilbertspinky brought up. there is a ridiculous amount of stuff you can do to spice up your playing.

but i think the most important thing you can do is train your ear, and learn to hear what you play before you actually play it, like i said. this is a surefire way to stop making your solos sound like scales.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#10
Yeah maybe I forgot a point... the problem, I'm aware, is my phrasing and how to "talk" with my guitar. The "method" I thought of was a way for me to like, get used to the theory and at the same time help me focus on melody, focusing on a few notes instead of a whole scale.

Edit: I'm also trying to get a good knowledge of the fretboard at the same time. Like if I give myself only C E and G, it help me get to know where those notes are on the fretboard.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Jul 14, 2010,
#11
Quote by AeolianWolf
oh, i see. i thought you were telling him not to worry about chord tones and just play licks like 70% of guitarists would do.

i still disagree that he should stay within the confines of transposed licks. TS, learn to develop your own melodic voice and style. learn to develop your phrasing. train your ear and learn to hear what you play before you play it. you're only going to get so far playing three notes, so i really suggest playing in key and emphasizing chord tones. for a good exercise, though, try limiting yourself to playing only chord tones, and focus on some of the things gilbertspinky said in his most recent post. watch your rhythm. pay attention to your phrasing. pay attention to dynamics (this one is very important; many, many guitarists don't know how to control dynamics effectively).

utilize some of the techniques gilbertspinky brought up. there is a ridiculous amount of stuff you can do to spice up your playing.

but i think the most important thing you can do is train your ear, and learn to hear what you play before you actually play it, like i said. this is a surefire way to stop making your solos sound like scales.

+like 12 or something
#12
Well there's these times where I have this crazy arse solo/riff in my head, but I'm just not able to transpose it to guitar.

What I wanted to do was start improvising slowly over a progression, perhaps even just one chord, to make it easier at first.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#13
TS: I think I'm about the same spot theory wise as you are. I have learned to create some basic chords and what scales can be played with each, but I have yet to actually develop my playing technique to keep up with my knowledge (also still have to reference materials in order to create some scales, chords, etc.). I've learned the basics to modes, but I think I'm going to just forget about those for now until I'm more technically versed.

I've always thought that I need to start improvising because I am really struggling with learning some tabs due to it just being hard for me to remember the notes that come up. I think this stems from me not being able to "hear" what I want to play before I play it as the others have mentioned. From what I've read this means that we need to work on our natural pitch (being able to tell what a note is by just hearing it). I'm interested to see what else you get in the way of help on this thread as I'm sure it will help me as well