#1
Hey guys, not sure if this is the right spot but... So I have had a decent keyboard for awhile now, but I have barely touched it. Pretty much because I have no idea how to start playing. I have a pretty good understanding of theory I think. I know how to build chords, the major scale, and other things of such. But I don't really know where to start with all this when playing piano. I have figured out the basic "shape" of chords on the piano. So I was wondering if you guys could give me some good exercises to get me started, and any tips, easy songs, etc. Anything would be appreciated, thanks.
#2
Don't think in shapes. Think in sharps in flats. Have fun with that and I'd advise you to just start working out songs from guitar to piano. Great way to familiarise yourself with the keys and makes you feel accomplished when you transfer it from another instrument. Other than that just throw a bunch of time towards it and see the progress fly by.
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#3
Alright, thanks. I usually use the shapes to memorize what I'm playing, but I have been trying to think of everything more like sharps and flats.
#4
The gentleman above me is spot on. Also, you might think about purchasing some of Nancy Faber's piano lesson books. They range from level 1A to 5A and are composed of songs and exercises that build on the principles of piano/keyboard.
#6
I'd like to get a teacher, but I am already taking lessons for guitar. So I cannot afford to take piano lessons to. I am planning on switching to piano lessons once I feel I have learnt the most I can for guitar from lessons.
#7
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Get a teacher.

no seriously get a teacher.


you actually don't need a teacher - i've become fairly adept on a keyboard without one. keyword: fairly. you don't really need a teacher until you get to the really advanced techniques -- some of those are extremely difficult to figure out effectively for yourself.

i agree with venice king. shapes might be able to get you by on guitar, but if you think in terms of shapes on the piano, the chances of you advancing past novice level aren't all that high. learn to think in terms of notes. play scales ten thousand times - it's not as simple as scales on guitar where all you need to do is move a pattern up the fretboard. i'm serious when i say ten thousand times - play a lot of scales. they do wonders for your finger strength, finger independence, and just overall maneuverability.
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#8
Thanks AeolianWolf. Looks like I gotta throw aside an hour or so for piano now. For the scales would it be good to start with C major, than after playing that a bunch of times go to G major, and etc? This way you keep adding more sharps/flats each time you change. Also should I use all five fingers, both hands over 2 octaves to start?
#9
Quote by SWAS
Thanks AeolianWolf. Looks like I gotta throw aside an hour or so for piano now. For the scales would it be good to start with C major, than after playing that a bunch of times go to G major, and etc? This way you keep adding more sharps/flats each time you change. Also should I use all five fingers, both hands over 2 octaves to start?


if you're an absolute beginner, i'd start with one octave. this way, you only need to repeat the thumb once. once you get some more finger dexterity, expand to two octaves -- remember that if you can play 2 octaves, you can play more than 2 octaves.

starting with C major is fine. i recommend getting down C major, G major, D major, A major, and E major, since the fingering for those five scales is exactly the same in both hands - the only difference is the black keys. then go to B major (in which the pinky of the left hand is not used), and F major (in which the pinky of the right hand is not used). save the remaining five major scales (the ones starting on black keys) until you develop some aptitude with these.

one-octave fingering for C major, G major, D major, A major, and E major:

R.H. - 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5
L.H. - 5 4 3 2 1 3 2 1

where 1 is the thumb and 5 is the pinky. you should be able to figure out the rest.

also, i recommend http://www.jazclass.aust.com/piano/default.htm to help you develop an understanding of good piano technique. in these early stages, don't go overboard with technique, but do keep it well in mind. if you have any questions, you can either PM me or make a thread here in the MT forum again - i'll be bound to catch that.
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#10
Alright, thanks. I will check that link out, and begin practicing ASAP. Ill probably PM you later about some other stuff.
#11
I've never played piano until a few weeks ago too. But because I can read sheet music I found it quite easy to learn. When playing scales I tend to play them by using the tones and semitone rules because it makes it easier.
For example:
Major scale
T T S T T T S
Natural Minor
T S T T S T T

Just so you can get a feel for how it looks like.
#12
I mostly taught myself the piano by comparing it to guitar and bass. First learn how to read, you may know where every note is on the grand staff but not know where those notes are on the piano (like with the right pitch/on the right octive, obviously the note itself is easy to find since there's only 12 of them). And if you have someone else to play with, have them play the left or right side and you play the other side, to practice either harmony or melody without having to put them together yet.
Learn scales, start trying to memorize chords (i still dont have them all memorized), and maybe visit this site pianolessons.com, its got good lessons but a lot of it is kind of common sense. it has great examples/exercises tho.
#13
practice the 3 scale groups, and I IV V/ i iv V progressions in all keys in different inversions. before long you'll be able to play lots of things.

I also found it's pretty fun to just pick an Elton John or Journey or Chicago song (a popular band or artist that lots of piano) and try to figure stuff out by ear.

Ear training and sight reading are both important, so also once you're comfortable with the keys pick up a real book and you should be good to go.
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#14
oh yeah and hal leonard has a load of books on piano and keyboards, even different books for different styles so if ur into, for example, progressive rock, just search amazon, "progressive rock hal leonard keyboards" and you can find some pretty good books to help u out. i'd recommend starting w/ either blues or jazz, or classical if u can find a classical piano book.