#1
If you have a powerchord riff and you stay within the same key but you play it in a different mode (Example, you have a riff in E aeolian but you adjust all the intervals to A dorian) what do you call that? Is that "progression" or what?
#2
modal shift?


here comes the "thats not modal" bandwagon
Last edited by Coagulation at Jul 14, 2010,
#3
Quote by Coagulation
modal shift?


here comes the "thats not modal" bandwagon


Ah damn.......are you saying I'm unintentionally starting some kind of war?
#4
well, i wouldn't call it a war, exactly.

don't say E aeolian. it's likely just tonal, and in E minor. however, without context, i can't prove that it's not E aeolian, so i can't say that it's wrong to call it as such. if it IS modal, don't call it a key. modes don't have keys. they can be thought of as similar concepts, but in our modern system, they are different -- in the sense that keys imply what is called "tonal music", and modes comprise what is called "modal music". they're not mutually exclusive, though.

getting back to the thread, let's say you have a riff in E minor, and you want to play that riff using the same generic intervals as A dorian (if you played the exact same intervals based on A, you'd just have A minor). let me show you what i mean:

say you have a riff in E minor. it's a boring riff, consisting of 4 notes: E B C D. to play that in A dorian, you'd play A E F# (NOT F) G. if you played F, you'd have A minor. the distance from E to C is a minor sixth. the distance from A to F# is a major sixth. so why play it? because the dorian mode contains a major sixth.

this is called "transposition".
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Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jul 14, 2010,
#5
Quote by The\m/
Ah damn.......are you saying I'm unintentionally starting some kind of war?



no no more of a crusade.. and it has been going on long before me or you came here i believe.
#6
Quote by The\m/
If you have a powerchord riff and you stay within the same key but you play it in a different mode (Example, you have a riff in E aeolian but you adjust all the intervals to A dorian) what do you call that? Is that "progression" or what?

Then nothing would change, because A Dorian has exactly the same notes as E minor. You can't do what you're asking and stay in the same key because if you're in the key of Em then that's your tonal centre, E. In that context if you try to "play A Dorian" all you're doing is playing E minor in a different place.

What you'd need to do is shift from E minor to E Dorian, but if you're using powerchords that's likely to go out of the window because you'll probably have notes that don't fit the mode due to the harmony you're creating, albeit a simple one with roots and fifths.
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