#1
I got two 212 amps....

A crate GX212 and a fender frontman 212r ( I got it for 75$)

But Its just two guitars and a drummer. But whats the best way to eq these amps to cut throught the mix?

I also use a marshall jackhammer OD with a Knockout EQ (which is awesome btw)

So what should i focus on?
#3
Its all about midrange when playing with drums. If you scoop the mids out your guitar will disappear behind the cymbals.
#4
I've been a drummer for 18 years. If you will throw some mids and cut the super high end a little, you're drummer might just hug ya...
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#5
To me mids sound like shit..... And amp setting recommendations?
#6
Maybe you shouldn't play a mid range instrument then...
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#7
Mids sound like shit? That's where most of the guitar's frequencies lie. You hate guitar?
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#8
haha no no not what I mean. I mean..I don't like the way they sound by themselves....But I'm playing by myself so maybe its not that....So when I'm playing with my drummer I should add more mids and cut some of the highs?
#9
From what I've seen, mids behave in a very strange way. When I'm jamming by myself in my room, a tiny scoop sounds the best. But inject any other instrument, even another guitarist, and suddenly, the mid knob becomes the awesome knob. Whenever you're playing with someone else, mids will help you cut through the mix and actually be heard.
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#10
Yeah setting an amps EQ and calling it good doesn't quite work all the time. Your amp could sound awesome in your bedroom and the second you get on stage you'll find your sound is slightly or completely different. While it may not sound technically good to your ears on stage, it's about what the sound guy and the audience hears. It's a constant tug of war between all instruments battling for space within the eq range. You've just gotta experiment and turn some knobs.
#12
You need to think about what you mean by 'cutting through the mix'. If you can't be heard by the audience then mids are the way to get a boost, just don't overdo it. Yes, you will need to adjust your tone settings for different room acoustics.

What I suspect though is that you are having trouble hearing yourself when others are playing. If you turn up then they will turn up, or hit the skins harder and no-one will hear. Your band will sound crap because one of you will win the volume war and that's all the audience will get, a crap balance.

To be able to pick yourself out of the mix is as skill you have to learn. It helps to think about what you are doing. What is drowning you out, the drums? Move away from them, move out of the line of the other guitarists amp. think of your sound coming out of your amp as a beam of light. Point it at your ears by tipping the cab back a little and standing in a direct line. Stand closer to your amp.

The quieter you play the more you will hear, get a mate to listen to you all and ask who is the loudest, turn them down, good luck with the drummer on that one.
#13
Quote by SayAnything
Yeah setting an amps EQ and calling it good doesn't quite work all the time. Your amp could sound awesome in your bedroom and the second you get on stage you'll find your sound is slightly or completely different. While it may not sound technically good to your ears on stage, it's about what the sound guy and the audience hears. It's a constant tug of war between all instruments battling for space within the eq range. You've just gotta experiment and turn some knobs.


Not to mention that every room is acoustically unique, and has different frequency responses (which are sometimes themselves fluctuating based upon things like chair/table configurations or other variable venue quirks). So not only are you contending with what your tone sounds like in your bands mix, but also what your tone sounds like within the space you currently occupy. Unless you have a dedicated FOH engineer you should probably be prepared to EQ yourself at every new venue to keep your tone consistently how you want it to sound. Seems counter intuitive, but if every room sounded exactly the same, I wouldn't have to constantly EQ my works PAs every time we set them up.

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#14
Get a long cable and walk out into the audience's domain and see what it sounds like there. It matters little what it sounds like on stage as long as you can actually hear yourself. The difference between what you hear and what the audience hears can be remarkable.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band