#1
Ok, this may be the silliest question ever asked on this board. Please bear with me.

If I want to play something half a step down, how would I go about that? Because if I move the capo down a fret, thats a whole step right? Would I have to tune my guitar from standard to...?
(This is so embarrassing, I really need to go back and learn theory.)
#2
For Example

C to D is ONE WHOLE STEP
even though you'd move up TWO semi tones.

C to C# = a semi tone or a half step.

So you would move it down a fret = down half a step
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#4
If you want to play something DOWN a half step, you have to tune your guitar so each string is a half step lower (Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Bb, Eb). If you put a capo on, you're tuning your guitar UP
#5
Quote by GiantHouseKey
If you want to play something DOWN a half step, you have to tune your guitar so each string is a half step lower (Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Bb, Eb). If you put a capo on, you're tuning your guitar UP


this
#7
Quote by GiantHouseKey
If you want to play something DOWN a half step, you have to tune your guitar so each string is a half step lower (Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Bb, Eb). If you put a capo on, you're tuning your guitar UP
He was talking about moving a capo from, say, the third fret to the second fret. That would be playing a half-step down.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
Ok, so if a guitar is in standard tuning (in the key of C? I don't even know) and you put a capo on the first fret, then the guitar would now be in C#? Then 2nd fret would make the guitar in D...Then 3rd D#..etc? Is this right?

Yes, I was originally doing something with the capo on the 4th fret-(E key??) and I need it half a step lower, so I guess I have to do it in D# on the 3rd fret...
(Unless I'm completely wrong with all of this.) I really appreciate your patience.
#9
Do you mean C standard tuning? It's genreally accepted that if you say standard tuning you mean E standard. If so, than yes. Once you put the capo on the first fret it would be C# standard, and so forth.
#10
Quote by Light&Sound
Ok, so if a guitar is in standard tuning (in the key of C? I don't even know) and you put a capo on the first fret, then the guitar would now be in C#? Then 2nd fret would make the guitar in D...Then 3rd D#..etc? Is this right?

Yes, I was originally doing something with the capo on the 4th fret-(E key??) and I need it half a step lower, so I guess I have to do it in D# on the 3rd fret...
(Unless I'm completely wrong with all of this.) I really appreciate your patience.

It sounds like you're a bit confused. In standard tuning, you can play in any key, it depends on what notes you play.

If you had a song in the key of C (for example), and you put a capo on the first fret and moved all the fingerings one fret up, you'd be playing the same thing in C#.
#11
I believe Standard tuning is Eminor. That would explain why so many guitar pieces are in Eminor(example; Metallica).

In short, a half-step(semi-tone)=1 fret, and whole-step(tone)=2 frets. That would mean 1 fret towards your headstock.

I recommend you start learning the chromatic scale before anything else. The principle is very easy, you just have to remember that theres no sharps/flats between B-C and E-F. Once you got that down learn the major scale. From there, it should all start making more sense to you.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Jul 16, 2010,
#12
Quote by Spike6sic6
I believe Standard tuning is Eminor. That would explain why so many guitar pieces are in Eminor(example; Metallica).

In short, a half-step(semi-tone)=1 fret, and whole-step(tone)=2 frets. That would mean 1 fret towards your headstock.

I recommend you start learning the chromatic scale before anything else. The principle is very easy, you just have to remember that theres no sharps/flats between B-C and E-F. Once you got that down learn the major scale. From there, it should all start making more sense to you.


Tuning has nothing to do with keys. You could be in E standard tuning and play a song in Fxx minor if you wanted.

As for the whole major scale thing, you got the right idea. Although you don't really "learn" the chromatic scale. It's just there. As long as you know that it is comprised solely of half-steps then you know it. But you do have the right idea about it in the sense that you need to know the musical alphabet before you move on to the major scale.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#13
Quote by food1010


Tuning has nothing to do with keys. You could be in E standard tuning and play a song in Fxx minor if you wanted.

As for the whole major scale thing, you got the right idea. Although you don't really "learn" the chromatic scale. It's just there. As long as you know that it is comprised solely of half-steps then you know it. But you do have the right idea about it in the sense that you need to know the musical alphabet before you move on to the major scale.


Sorry if I misexplained my point. I reckognize you can play in any key in any tuning. Just pointing out that all open strings are notes from the Eminor/Gmajor scale.

And by learning the chromatic scale I just mean, knowing how notes follow each others, and where there's sharps/flats. It's like the alphabet, you need to know that it goes ABC...
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Jul 16, 2010,
#14
Quote by Spike6sic6
What I meant is that all open strings are notes in the Eminor scale. Sorry if I misexplained my point.
Well, they are all in C major and A minor, too. It doesn't really mean anything.
And by learning the chromatic scale I just mean, knowing how notes follow each others, and where there's sharps/flats. It's like the alphabet, you need to know that it goes ABC...

Well, I'd word that differently. Like: Learn the notes of the fretboard.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#15
half step: 1 fret
whole step: 2 frets.
if ur playing with a capo, move the capo down 1 fret (towards the head of the guitar)
if ur not playing with a capo, just move every note/chord down 1 fret. this puts whatever you're playing into a different key (if you're the lead guitarist or the song-writer and the song isn't finished you'll need to know what key you're in).
#16
Quote by hockeyplayer168
Well, they are all in C major and A minor, too. It doesn't really mean anything.


Didn't think about that.

Quote by hockeyplayer168
Well, I'd word that differently. Like: Learn the notes of the fretboard.


It's not learning the notes of the fretboard, it's more than that. It's learning what notes are, regardless of the instrument you're playing. And that's the chromtic scale. It's not so hard to understand, or is it?
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Jul 16, 2010,
#17
Quote by Spike6sic6
It's not learning the notes of the fretboard, it's more than that. It's learning what notes are, regardless of the instrument you're playing. And that's the chromtic scale. It's not so hard to understand, or is it?

I guess I don't really see the difference...
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#18
Quote by hockeyplayer168
I guess I don't really see the difference...


Learning that E is on the 7th fret 5th string won't help you with playing piano, will it?

Anyways, the point is the point and it's made.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#19
Quote by Spike6sic6
Learning that E is on the 7th fret 5th string won't help you with playing piano, will it?

Anyways, the point is the point and it's made.

No, the point is not made. I said learn ALL the notes on the fretboard. I'm pretty sure if you learn all the notes on the fretboard, you'll learn where all the sharps and flats are and their relationship with other notes. I know I did and I sure didn't do it using the chromatic scale...
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#20
Quote by hockeyplayer168
No, the point is not made. I said learn ALL the notes on the fretboard. I'm pretty sure if you learn all the notes on the fretboard, you'll learn where all the sharps and flats are and their relationship with other notes. I know I did and I sure didn't do it using the chromatic scale...


Ok let's make it simple for you alright...

C C#/Db D D#/Eb E F F#/Gb G G#/Ab A A#/Bb B

Conversation over.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#21
Quote by Spike6sic6
Ok let's make it simple for you alright...

C C#/Db D D#/Eb E F F#/Gb G G#/Ab A A#/Bb B

Conversation over.
GREAT JOB!!
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#23
lol. Ok. Yes, I know I need to learn the chromatic scale. I'm a bit more confused about something else now. I was sure the standard tuning of a guitar was in the C key.

My tuner goes straight to C when I turn it on...There is an option of F,Bb, and Eb as well. C sounds right, it sounds like standard turning...So...What key is standard tuning? Don't tell me I've been playing everything a bit off for months now.
#24
Quote by Light&Sound
lol. Ok. Yes, I know I need to learn the chromatic scale. I'm a bit more confused about something else now. I was sure the standard tuning of a guitar was in the C key.

My tuner goes straight to C when I turn it on...There is an option of F,Bb, and Eb as well. C sounds right, it sounds like standard turning...So...What key is standard tuning? Don't tell me I've been playing everything a bit off for months now.

Standard tuning is not a key. It just means the strings are tuned to E,A,D,G,B,E.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#25
Quote by Light&Sound
lol. Ok. Yes, I know I need to learn the chromatic scale. I'm a bit more confused about something else now. I was sure the standard tuning of a guitar was in the C key.

My tuner goes straight to C when I turn it on...There is an option of F,Bb, and Eb as well. C sounds right, it sounds like standard turning...So...What key is standard tuning? Don't tell me I've been playing everything a bit off for months now.

Standard tuning is not in any specific key. As I've already stated, you can play any key in any tuning, it all depends on what notes you use.
#26
Quote by Light&Sound
lol. Ok. Yes, I know I need to learn the chromatic scale. I'm a bit more confused about something else now. I was sure the standard tuning of a guitar was in the C key.

My tuner goes straight to C when I turn it on...There is an option of F,Bb, and Eb as well. C sounds right, it sounds like standard turning...So...What key is standard tuning? Don't tell me I've been playing everything a bit off for months now.


Get a tuner that isn't confusing, I had one like that and it messed me up when I was a beginner
love is love // return to dust
#27
Okay, I will try to clear up some confusion.

A guitar is not set up in any key. You can tune a guitar to anything and play in any key you wanted to. You could use an Open D tuning and play a song the key of G#. I don't know who in their right mind would do that, but it is possible.

It seems that their is some confusion between the tuning of and instrument and whether or not instrument needs to be transposed. I don't really know much about the concept, but it means that when a person plays a note marked in the staff with a transposing intrument (mostly horn insturment, woodwinds, etc.), the actual note that sounds is different. So when writing music for a transposing intrument, one needs to compensate for that by adjusting the music to make sure the sounded note is the one actually meant to be sounded.

Example: When a Bb instuemtent plays a C note, it actually sounds Bb, not C (hence the name). So when writing for it, one has to move the music for the intrument down a full step (because Bb is a step lower than C).

A guitar is a non-transposing intrument. When you play a C, you get a C. But, it sounds an octave lower than written. So in a way, it is a transposing instrument, but not really.

So a guitar in standard tuning can't possibly in the key of Em/G. It just so happens that guitar oriented music tends to be heavier, so the lowest note on the guitar, E, is used. It also just happens that the heaviness is accompanied by a sadder sound, hence the minor toanlity.

The standard tuning of a guitar is E, A, D, G, B, E. Unsuprsingly, it is called Standard Tuning. Technically, you can call it E Standard, but nobody does that. It's simply Standard. But when going into differnt tunings (not keys) such as D standard, the note is there to clarify what the lowest note is. The Standard part tells you the relationship the other stings have with each other. In Standard, all of the strings are a fourth apart, except for the second string (B). It is major third away from the third string.

Another thing: If you're going to learn music theory, play the guitar, and plan on using the guitar a lot, learn the notes of the on the fretboard. If you don't, you're doing yourself a disservice.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#28
or u know you could just tune your guitar down 1 half step and avoid learning anything...
eb, Bb, Gb, Db, Ab, Eb, thats what your open strings would be. use a tuner if u dont know what ur doing.