#1
Newbie here I am 36 years old. I have some free time on my hands and thought I would learn the guitar. Always wanted to learn ever since my short guitar experience when I was 12. At 12 got lessons and they taught me to read music and not chords. So while my friends were playing Black Sabbath and AC/DC I was kicking out Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. :-k After 6 months I retired from playing the guitar but always had a itch to play again. Fast forward till now...

Well I did a ton of research an for the money I wanted to spend I bought:

http://www.americanmusical.com/Item--i-EPI-LPSPIIPRO-VS

^I really have no experience of what is a good guitar or what feels right, and just by reading online and trying to get knowledge did I make a decent choice for a first guitar. Mind you my budget was around $200-$300.

I should mention I plan on playing/learning classic type rock like the Beatles and 60s music. Also would like to learn AC/DC hard rock music.
Last edited by Mantis67 at Jul 14, 2010,
#2
ehh... for that money you could've gotten a used squier strat and roland cube, but what you got works for starting over. Generally it's a good idea to avoid "starter packs" like these.

Edit: Welcome! I think you'll like it here
Last edited by Helicopters! at Jul 14, 2010,
#3
I'd say it looks decent, I can't actually pick it up obviously but for your price range the package sounds nice. As a beginner I can't imagine you having much to complain about just due to lack of experience unless you have dead frets or something really obvious. I'd also advise not comparing to your freinds' guitars else you might get a more expensive taste than you'd have rather preferred :p. Either way you should have plenty of fun on this starter, just don't be too rough on it and even the cheap starter should hold together for a good while. My only real complaint is that it's only a 22 fretter which may or may not hinder your ability to play. Another thing to consider is a whammy/tremelo bar, but getting a decent set up for one of those will likely be out of your price range and have to wait for your next guitar purchase. Hope this was helpful.
#4
@Helicopters! I can definitely vouch for the cube. Great little at home amp, I;m running a 30 watt cube right now and am perfectly satisfied with it. I suppose it could be an option to look around for second hand setups around your area, maybe bring one of your friends to help check out the quality of whatever you find, as long as it isn't 'too' used, second hand can definitely save you a lot of buck for your head-bang. :p
#6
Yeah man, for 250 bucks, I'd almost say any guitar and amp from a reputable brand is good.

Hope you stick with it
#7
Quote by Horizontal
Man, the guitar alone sells for like, $529 at my local guitar shop. It's a good buy, and I have played it before. All I can say is that it plays pretty well. For a beginner guitar, I think it would be good.


Guitar Stores usually price things higher than the internet, they have to make a profit and it's the price you pay for being able to play the guitar before you buy it and know that you won't have to wait for it.

Also when you order something off the internet, you have no idea if what your buying actually looks like whats in the picture.
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#8
Quote by Horizontal
Man, the guitar alone sells for like, $529 at my local guitar shop. It's a good buy, and I have played it before. All I can say is that it plays pretty well. For a beginner guitar, I think it would be good.

$529 for an Epiphone special? Are you serious? Wonder what their Gibsons cost.
#9
I had one of those Epi II's. I don't know if I got an exceptional one, or what, but it was a great guitar. I'm just selling it now, actually, and reluctant to do so.

The only thing you'll be looking for soon is an amp. I've tried several starter amps, and they lack. You'd do well to keep it on the clean channel and maybe pick up a Zoom G1 effects processor for about $70 new. It'll really enhance your experience - inexpensively.
Water which is too pure has no fish - Ts'ai Ken T'an
#10
Welcome back to the world of guitar. I'd say you chose a pretty decent kit, The starters these days are generally of pretty decent quality compared to the starter guitars of the 60s or 70s.
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.
#11
Epi II and a Roland Cube
best way to go
just remember one thing... avoid packs like the one in the link
#12
The Epi Special II is an alright guitar. It was my very first electric guitar, and it got the job done just fine. A common problem with them is their toggle switches. (For the pickups) Sometimes you have to mess with it a bit to get it to switch to the treble pickup. And as for an amp, look for a 15 watt Roland Cube. Those things are great for the money.
Epi Elitist LP Plus
Marshall Class 5
Vox AC30 CC2


"A person is a success if they get up in the morning and gets to bed at night and in between does what he wants to do."
#13
Well after getting my Epi Special II from AmerianMusicSupply.com and having to send it back because the neck screws were stripped from the body got my replacement.

Learning to play...

The guitar was really out of tune, never tuning a guitar before having the auto tuner was nice but still gave me some problems. The G string was so far out of tune that the B light indicator was on. 5 of the 6 string were like that. I thought maybe I was doing something wrong until the chords I played and the DVD played sounded dead on.

Chords...
I started off with A, E, and D. (The CD only teaches A, E, D chords and how to play Louie Louie.) Mind you first time ever playing any chord on the guitar. A was a bit tough to get because my fingers had hard time fitting on same fret or did not press hard enough on string. Either way I am sure practice, finger strength, and callous build up will help. Speaking of fingers, after 30-40 mins of chords, the tips of my fingers are a little sore.

The funny thing is after about 1 hour and 10 mins I learned more in that time than a few months of lessons when I was a kid.
Last edited by Mantis67 at Jul 23, 2010,
#14
since its your first guitar/amp it really doesn't matter what it is. that setup will do just fine for any beginner.
#15
Quote by handbanana
since its your first guitar/amp it really doesn't matter what it is. that setup will do just fine for any beginner.


I second this. If what you're playing now feels fine, then keep going on it as far as you want. Then, if you feel justified to upgrade, or wish to keep going but desire better equipment, nothing wrong with doing so.


Oh, and go to stores and try guitars, even one's you can't afford (if they will allow). No one here will be able to tell you what you will like, except you. So, go out there and try em' out, even if you're not looking for one.
#16
Honestly, starting out with a cheap little guitar gives you an advantage those spoiled rich kid prodigies don't have. Inexpensive guitars usually wind up having problems later on down the line. Usually not too serious, they are guaranteed to teach you how to set up a guitar, change strings quickly and properly (No locking tuners means you need to learn how to wrap the string so it locks itself, or it'll never stay in tune.) and overall take care of it. If you start out with a $2000 guitar, it's gonna behave like one; by surviving. Every guitar develops problems someday, usually due to environment, but they all do. Sooner you learn how to fix it, the better.
Quote by fly135
Great list Rutch. On re-reading this one I'd have to say Solid State means not liquid or gas.

I figured it out.
#17
Quote by Ishiga
Honestly, starting out with a cheap little guitar gives you an advantage those spoiled rich kid prodigies don't have. Inexpensive guitars usually wind up having problems later on down the line. Usually not too serious, they are guaranteed to teach you how to set up a guitar, change strings quickly and properly (No locking tuners means you need to learn how to wrap the string so it locks itself, or it'll never stay in tune.) and overall take care of it. If you start out with a $2000 guitar, it's gonna behave like one; by surviving. Every guitar develops problems someday, usually due to environment, but they all do. Sooner you learn how to fix it, the better.


I second this. I learned more about guitars tweaking a used 3/4 squier I bought as a starter for my daughter than I ever wanted to know. But that's a good thing, when we both moved up, I had the confidence and ability to restring and make adjustments with success. I made my mistakes with the crap guitar, which is how it shoud be. Good luck.