#1
Hi I'm learning Four on Six by Wes Montgomery as part of my placement audition for the Guitar Sessions camp at Berklee. I'm relatively new to playing jazz, but i'm getting better. But I'd like to know what scales are good for playing that specific song and any other scales jazz artists use normally would be nice as well. Thanks!
#3
Quote by KoenDercksen
All scales... Jazz is really more about context and using that context to your advantage. Like accenting certain chord tones that aren't diatonic. I doubt you will find a jazz song over which you can solo with one scale.


What exactly do you mean by accenting chord tones that aren't diatonic? I've only been learning about music theory in the past few months with my guitar teacher. Do you mean like playing C Major scale over an A chord? The A and E notes will match, the C# and the C will clash (which makes it non-diatonic), but you're still able to accentuate that A note if you're careful.

Again, still learning about a lot of this music theory stuff, but it's neat when you can just say "Screw it. The notes don't all fit together, but it sounds cool." Going past the simple "This is a C Major chord, I have to play C Major over it" way of writing is when it gets fun
#4
Ill give you the scales (the scale IS the chord and the chord IS the scale in a way) you should think about other scales that would work, available tensions and ways to use chromatics to add flavor and tension, as well as things like rhythmic pacing and phrasing.

four bars of g-7 some would say G dorian, G aeolian would work as well. you could also mess around with a harmonic minor sound (really just using natural 7ths and flatted 7ths together) or a minor blues/pentatonic sound.
a two-five to Bb. You can think C dorian, F mixolydian or Bb major over this part for the notes. make sure to bring out the chord tones and remember that the third becomes the seventh.
a two five to Ab same thing as above except for Ab major, Bb dorian or Eb mixolydian
a two five to G Major same thing as above except the note names change
a two five to Db.
three more bars of G-7. already gone over
A two five to Bb major followed by a G-7. already gone over, over the G-7 think relative minor.
Eb7 D7 this can kind of be like a tritone sub thing. more likely think Eb mixolydian, D7 mixolydian. also maybe try a lydian dominant sound (also cool anywhere you can do a mixolydian, also think of using a natural 7th in your mixolydian scales as a passing tone--also thought of as Bebop Dominant)
G-7 already gone over
a two five to G minor (specifically harmonic for the ii-V and a natural minor or dorian sound on the i).

Keeping these scales in mind (and going over them to get them under your fingers) then think about arpeggios and chord tones. practice soloing in only whole notes and chord tones, followed by half, quarter etc. with eight notes try to put chord tones on the on beats or at least the 1 and 3 and think of connecting 3rds and sevenths.
eventually, get to the point of running eighth notes over the entire form with a metronome, making sure you can hear the changes (with no one comping behind you), also think about solfege-ing (singing with solfege) the root motion and various lines comprised of thirds and sevenths.
finally, forget all this and practice playing the melody and (while keeping the form and using a metronome) and embelishing it spontaniously, until you go from melody to complete improvisation.
then work on doing this with someone comping behind you, or with a metronome, hitting chords hear and there that connect with your lines, or just alternating a two measure solo phrase (over the form and harmony) with two measures of comping.
#5
Quote by elsporko
What exactly do you mean by accenting chord tones that aren't diatonic? I've only been learning about music theory in the past few months with my guitar teacher. Do you mean like playing C Major scale over an A chord? The A and E notes will match, the C# and the C will clash (which makes it non-diatonic), but you're still able to accentuate that A note if you're careful.

Again, still learning about a lot of this music theory stuff, but it's neat when you can just say "Screw it. The notes don't all fit together, but it sounds cool." Going past the simple "This is a C Major chord, I have to play C Major over it" way of writing is when it gets fun


For example, you're in C major but the song decides to make you play a G7b9. The G7 is diatonic to C major (G-B-D-F) but the b9 (Ab) isn't diatonic to C major. However when this chord is played, you can still use the Ab without any problems. That's what I meant
#6
For example, you're in C major but the song decides to make you play a G7b9. The G7 is diatonic to C major (G-B-D-F) but the b9 (Ab) isn't diatonic to C major. However when this chord is played, you can still use the Ab without any problems. That's what I mean


Aside from on the head, the song doesnt make you play anything. When you see a G7b9 and your comping for the soloist, you could play a vanilla G7, or you could play a G7 with any alteration you want (though you should pay attention to the vocabulary the soloist is using) and even in the case of a G7b9 the b9 isn't a chord tone, its a tension. your right in the sense of the presence on a lead sheet lets you use an Ab in the key of C over that chord, but the soloist can also use any altered tensions they want, as tensions or as chromatics. The ab is also part of the C bebop Major scale when thinking of creating eight note lines over a progression (ii-Vb9-I for arguments sake) to a C major 7 chord.
#7
Quote by tehREALcaptain
Aside from on the head, the song doesnt make you play anything. When you see a G7b9 and your comping for the soloist, you could play a vanilla G7, or you could play a G7 with any alteration you want (though you should pay attention to the vocabulary the soloist is using) and even in the case of a G7b9 the b9 isn't a chord tone, its a tension. your right in the sense of the presence on a lead sheet lets you use an Ab in the key of C over that chord, but the soloist can also use any altered tensions they want, as tensions or as chromatics. The ab is also part of the C bebop Major scale when thinking of creating eight note lines over a progression (ii-Vb9-I for arguments sake) to a C major 7 chord.


Ofcourse, I just said that for lack of better wording... English is not my first language

And sure, you can use chromatics as much as you want, it's just easier to choose a chromatic when it's present on your sheet.

Also your last point is true.
#8
Jazz is actually more about learning how to play outside of scales in order to complement the chords, then any series of notes themselves.
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#9
Here's how I would look at it:

The main part of the song basically cycles through a couple different keys (Bb, Ab, G, Db).

You have four bars of Gm7 which are in Bb (or more correctly, G minor).
You have a ii V in Bb.
You have a ii V in Ab.
You have a ii V in G.
You have a ii V in Db.

That's really all you need scale-wise. Now of course, that's not to say "play these scales and you'll have a great jazz solo." In fact, you do have to know what you're doing beyond scales. You should know what you're doing in terms of tensions/alterations, chord tones and passing tones, and all that good stuff. The scales are the easy part, but that doesn't get you very far.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea