#1
So if I were to play in the C minor scale, playing the C and Eb often, and have another guitar playing in C minor but landing on F a lot, and have a synth playing in C minor but emphasizing the note D, would I get a ninth chord sound? Could I manipulate it to sound metal? What would all the chords i'd get from guitar 2 and the synth do for it?
#2
Quote by The Hunger
So if I were to play in the C minor scale, playing the C and Eb often, and have another guitar playing in C minor but landing on F a lot, and have a synth playing in C minor but emphasizing the note D, would I get a ninth chord sound?


best way to find out..... try it..... LISTEN.

Quote by The Hunger

Could I manipulate it to sound metal?


sure, why not

Quote by The Hunger


What would all the chords i'd get from guitar 2 and the synth do for it?


you've given us a vague description of something that sounds rather random, so there is no way anyone could accurately answer this.


Why not try your ideas.... listen..... and decide for yourself what it sounds like. We would only be guessing (and probably arguing over our guesses)
shred is gaudy music
#3
Quote by The Hunger
So if I were to play in the C minor scale, playing the C and Eb often, and have another guitar playing in C minor but landing on F a lot, and have a synth playing in C minor but emphasizing the note D, would I get a ninth chord sound?


Kinda depends if they are happening at the same time. If you just have like 3 moving lines of music and they all play C, Eb and D at some point, you may not get the sound you're looking for, but if they line up occasionally and the rest of the notes don't just make random terrible chords right after and before, it may work out. It depends on your arrangement though.
Last edited by Warrior47 at Jul 15, 2010,
#5
If you have someone playing the note G over a C maj chord you're going to get a major sound (you're just adding another 5th to the chord). If you have another instrument playing a D at the same time the tonality is going to resemble that of a Dsus2 since you've now added the second. I think it's going to be more dissonant though because when you play a Dsus2 the 2nd is replacing the third, now you'll have both going at the same time.
Don't know if that's any help but basically, the interaction of the note being played with the chord being played is what will determine the color of the progression.
#6
Quote by Warrior47
It depends on your arrangement though.


this. a Cm7 chord split among two guitars will sound different than it would for one guitar. a Dm9 chord would have a different effect on the listener if it was arranged for the strings rather than the brass.

it's all about the arrangement.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#7
Quote by AeolianWolf
this. a Cm7 chord split among two guitars will sound different than it would for one guitar. a Dm9 chord would have a different effect on the listener if it was arranged for the strings rather than the brass.

it's all about the arrangement.


+1

It will sound different depending on if it's split among different instruments, which instrument plays is the lowest, and so on.

It will function the same harmonically (and as far as progressions go) whether or not you play it on 1 instrument or 10.

How easy it'll work or actualy sounds like a chord.. well, less complicated chords (like triads or 7ths) are a bit easier to get the effect working than more complicated added and altered chords.
Also, as a rule of thumb, dont split flavour notes too much among instruments or too many instruments playing full chords. You want the notes to be complimentary, not created clashing effects because it sounds like different chords played at the same time rather than the harmony creating one chord. Unless that is what your going for offcoarse.