#1
Hi Guys,

Really need some help on this. So, I took a TRS Floyd Rose guitar into to get set-up, as it was very stiff in comparison to my Schaller on another guitar. Once in the shop, the tech tells me the saddles need replacing. Fine. He then has a closer look and says the springs are snagging on the back of the trem cavity - meaning a new sustain block will need to be put. Total cost around £80 with new parts. Is it worth getting this done or should I: a). block the trem. B). Buy a new OFR when I have the money?

Thanks.
#2
well, if you use the trem enough I would either get it fixed or get it replaced. I personally would replace it, just because a trem with problems now will probably have problems later.

once you do that, get a tremol-no, and install it. That way blocking is an option but it doesnt have to be
Ibanez S7521qm 7 string
Ibanez S771pb
Fender Jaguar HH Special
PRS SE Custom 24 7 string
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
#3
Assuming it's an Ibanez made Lo-TRS, you can get an OFR (Incl OFR studs) to fit straight in there. That should solve all of your problems and upgrade the entire guitar to boot.

If you're not an avid whammy-user, as the guy above me says, you could just as well block the bridge with wood, or more expensively, a certain system of the Tremol-no variety. I'm not sure if the Tremol-no fits into the TRS without any mods though.
#4
Thanks. Yes, it's a Tacheuchi trs-101 if you know it. Apparently, the steel edges on it are fine, but as it is the trem was installed incorrectly - it's a custom guitar - and the routing didn't give enough room for the springs to move. The tech would have to either carve away at the wood or replace this sustain block. PLus, all the saddles are screwed.

I have another guitar with a fully working trem, so I could use that and then replace this later on, I guess. Any further thoughts would be appreciated.


Quote by Y00p
Assuming it's an Ibanez made Lo-TRS, you can get an OFR (Incl OFR studs) to fit straight in there. That should solve all of your problems and upgrade the entire guitar to boot.

If you're not an avid whammy-user, as the guy above me says, you could just as well block the bridge with wood, or more expensively, a certain system of the Tremol-no variety. I'm not sure if the Tremol-no fits into the TRS without any mods though.
#5
Ah, but if it's custom, I'm not so sure if it will just readily accept an OFR or any other bridge without extensive modifications and/or measuring and experimenting... Especially so if this route didn't even securely fit the LoTRS.

But as you said, just use the other guitar for now and then when you have money or time to spend, see what you can do about this one.
#6
So, to this end would it be worth spending the money getting the LoTrs correct? That will cost about £70. Getting a OFR will cost £180 plus labour to put in - £250?

Quote by Y00p
Ah, but if it's custom, I'm not so sure if it will just readily accept an OFR or any other bridge without extensive modifications and/or measuring and experimenting... Especially so if this route didn't even securely fit the LoTRS.

But as you said, just use the other guitar for now and then when you have money or time to spend, see what you can do about this one.
#7
Well, if the routing in the back isn't deep enough, go and grab a hammer and chisel because that's an easy fix (mind you, I don't know about your emotional or financial attachment to the guitar). As for the saddles, try to see if you can get them yourself through Rich at Ibanezrules.com and install them yourself for less. Yeah, the site's a nightmare, but it works and he has the stuff.

I'd see what that'd cost you first, before making any other decisions.
#8
Thanks - that was one of the tech's suggestions to chisel out the wood to make the springs move. He doesn't have the routing equipment, so I guess he will us a hammer. The thought doesn't really fill me with joy, but I guess so long as it doesn't harm the appearance of the wood or the tone, then fine. I will also cover up the back cavity.

Honestly, I would have no idea how to replace the saddles. But the tech says he has the saddles already.


Quote by Y00p
Well, if the routing in the back isn't deep enough, go and grab a hammer and chisel because that's an easy fix (mind you, I don't know about your emotional or financial attachment to the guitar). As for the saddles, try to see if you can get them yourself through Rich at Ibanezrules.com and install them yourself for less. Yeah, the site's a nightmare, but it works and he has the stuff.

I'd see what that'd cost you first, before making any other decisions.
#9
The saddles are broken? Weird. Your guitar should accept the OFR with some cavity routing, but the stud locations should be okay.
"Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you." - Aldous Huxley
#10
Here's the word from the tech, any commentary would be good as my knowledge is lacking:

"I realised that the two trem posts were completely shot and the reason for this is that the threads which hold the posts were not gripping the body, and the knife edges on the trem had cut into the posts as the threads had started to pull out of the body. I found some posts which fit and should work. It was then that I found the problem with the springs snagging on the back of the trem cavity."

What do you think?


Quote by Zamorak
The saddles are broken? Weird. Your guitar should accept the OFR with some cavity routing, but the stud locations should be okay.
#11
Saddles are easy to replace. Just look at how the old ones are on. Put the new ones on exactly the same. Take the first off and replace it, then do the next. Don't take all the old ones off at once, because you might forget how they went on. This gives you 6 tries to reproduce the assembly.

Sounds like you have threaded posts (your posts are like a big screw) as opposed to bushings and posts. You could follow procedures to fill in the holes and tighten up the posts and you are good to go on that mark.

As far as the cavity, I think it costs about $35 for a brass trem block, which would solve your problem AND improve your tone & sustain. The blocks are simply attached with screws and are as easy to deal with as the saddles. A much better solution than hacking away with a hammer and chisel. IF you have the depth for a longer block. You do need to precisely measure the screw holes or make sure you are getting an exact replacement block for your specific trem.
Water which is too pure has no fish - Ts'ai Ken T'an