#1
Hello!
So, I finally got new strings for my electric last week and got my friend to re-string it (my first set of new strings and I didn't wanna snap them), and he told me to wait a few days before tuning it up, so I waited a week and I tuned it last night (after snapping the e string a millions times), and I decided I wanted to start playing my electric. So anyway, heres my questions..

What are some songs for a 'newbie' to play?
Where do I start learning (e.g. what scales/what techniques)?


I want to start fresh you see, as I normally play acoustic and even when I play that EVERYTHING I play is chords (I'm about grade 6 in rhythm). So I want to learn everything from scratch as I want to improve my sh*t playing.

Thanks.
#2
first of all you don't have to wait a week to tune your guitar, just do it when you change the strings, they will go out of tune at first but after a while they should stay in tune

Learn song you like, try a few and see which one is the easiest for you, kearning song that you dont like it seems stupid to me
#3
Contrary to your intention, start with songs you already know on acoustic. One of the first things you'll need to deal with is the feel and response of an electric vs. an acoustic. So just playing open chord tunes is going to help you get that.

Theory for an electric is the same as for acoustic. So you need to set a goal for what you want to do and focus on getting there. What is it you want? To play Bluegerass, Country, Metal, etc? Rythmn, lead, fingerstyle, etc? Covers or originals?

And on the strings... You could wait a year after putting new strings on and they will still stretch when you start playing them. Just tune them, bend them all a couple steps, retune, and repeat until they stop stretching. It will only take a few minutes. Some people will stretch them up like a suitcase handle, but I end up breaking them sometimes that way. I prefer to bend them.
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Last edited by Ratraisin at Jul 16, 2010,
#4
Well dont forget about Iron Man.
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#6
For future reference:

When restringing, it's not necessary to wait for a few days (or even for a couple of hours) before tuning up. If a string breaks right after tuning, it's usually one of two things: a manufacturing defect (not that uncommon) or a problem with the guitar.

Since you said the E string broke a million times, I'm guessing it's the latter.

Most of the time when this happens, it's because the saddle the string is resting on isn't smooth. Next time you snap that string, check if it broke at the bridge. If so, take a very good look at the saddle to check for any imperfections. Should you see any, you can use some really fine sandpaper to smooth it out.

If the problem persists, take it to a tech (in the end it'll be cheaper than buying a new E string every day ).


As for what to play, I'd say the people over at Guitar Techniques (https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=9) or Tab Talk (https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=10) can help you out.
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#8
Thanks everyone. I knew already that I didn't have to wait to tune it, but I was just to lazy to set my amp up and stuff, so I did it yesterday. I think the string breaking was a fault with me cutting the string too short because when I took a string off my other electric (which I never use because I don't like the feel of it - but I got it for free so its all good) it didn't snap once and it has loads of spare string. And it was snapping towards the headstock, but I think I just cut it a bit too far down that's all.
Oh and I already play a bit of electric (in my band), and I'm pretty much used to the feel of it. I want to just learn anything that'll make me a better lead player so thats why I asked here. I mostly play acoustic, indie and rock (mostly what people I know listen to).
Thanks for all the responses by the way.
#9
The "used" string probably had a kink or two in it and when you re-installed it on another guitar the kink was a weak spot. You can buy new sets of quality strings for $5 (D'Addario for eg) and you really shouldn't install used strings on your guitar. I like to check & adjust (if necessary) my entire guitar setup when I restring and intonation must be done with new strings to be accurate.
Moving on.....
#10
Quote by Fieryhead
I want to just learn anything that'll make me a better lead player


You can start by changing your own strings... I kid I kid... :P

Black Sabbath is always a great place to start. There's plenty of variety to keep you challenged, and tons of easy riffs to keep you happy too.
#11
Quote by KenG
The "used" string probably had a kink or two in it and when you re-installed it on another guitar the kink was a weak spot. You can buy new sets of quality strings for $5 (D'Addario for eg) and you really shouldn't install used strings on your guitar. I like to check & adjust (if necessary) my entire guitar setup when I restring and intonation must be done with new strings to be accurate.


Thats what I originally did, and the only reason I took the string off my other guitar is because I have no money at the moment. Otherwise I would've bought a new set.

Quote by concat
You can start by changing your own strings... I kid I kid... :P Black Sabbath is always a great place to start. There's plenty of variety to keep you challenged, and tons of easy riffs to keep you happy too.

I can now, its just it was my first set and I didn't want to waste £10. But I can do it now pretty easily. Okay, I'll check them out .
#12
Quote by Fieryhead
I think the string breaking was a fault with me cutting the string too short because when I took a string off my other electric (which I never use because I don't like the feel of it - but I got it for free so its all good) it didn't snap once and it has loads of spare string. And it was snapping towards the headstock, but I think I just cut it a bit too far down that's all.
I always cut the string a tuner up (so stretch the string out and say, if it was the low E, I'd cut it at the A tuner.

For scales, learn the pentatonic, learn different lead parts in songs, then use what licks and stuff you've learned from that over a backing track (like blues, for example) - that's how I started.
It helps you learn how to improvise, and if you can, change your licks and your playing based on what chord is being played, by beginning and ending your licks on the notes that make up the chord. An easy way of learning chord tones is through the CAGED system. Shaping your solo to the chords isn't always neccesary (e.g. RHCP almost never does this), but it's a useful skill and helps make your solos and leads sound more 'professional'.

After you learn to do this, experiment with other scales such as the Natural Minor, Dorian, Mixolydian and harmony.

Oh, and if you can't do it, learn to Vibrato nicely (I'm assuming you know how to do this since you've played acoustic, but). A good vibrato is the difference between a good solo and one thats just really damned annoying.

I'm probably not the best person to help, but this is what I reckon

Song wise, you might want to start with stuff that's chord based, like AC/DC, or RHCP. Cocaine is one hell of a track to improvise too as well (y)
Sunshine of Your Love is another beginner favourite. It also has the riff changing keys between Dm and Gm (I > IV), which is very common in blues.
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Last edited by AntiG3 at Jul 16, 2010,
#13
How did we forget Smells Like Teen Spirit by Nirvana?
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#14
practise pentatonic scales. there are soo many patterns created by a simple pentatonic scale and there are eveb more created by pentatonic scales with a slight addition other notes from harmonic minor, or major scales.
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