#1
How do you write a (power) chord progression behind singing vocals so that it sounds decent? I understand scales and everything. Is there some type of harmony 'tip' so that the notes of the power chord match up with the vocals? I don't want to write a song where the power chords being played are the same thing that is being sang. Can anyone help?

I would like to get many answers from different people, because everyone has their own ways.
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Last edited by JakeIsInsane at Jul 16, 2010,
#2
You can use many different progressions for the same vocal melody (assuming that the vocal melody doesn't only sing chord tones).

You could however look at some notes and base your choices off of that, for example if the vocal melody starts on a C and you're in C minor, you could play a C5, until the vocal melody for example lands on the Eb and then play an Eb5 etc etc.

It depens on what you like, much resolving or alot of tension or whatever. Just use your ears
#3
Write the chord progression in the same scale as the vocals?
Like if the vocal scale is G Major. Use A5, C5, G5, F5.
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#4
Quote by Drmmrboi180
Write the chord progression in the same scale as the vocals?
Like if the vocal scale is G Major. Use A5, C5, G5, F5.

Wouldn't it be A5, C5, G5, and F#5?
#6
Can you 'hear' what they should sound like as you sing the melody?
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#7
Quote by KoenDercksen
Correct

Nope, F#5 Does not occur in G major, itd be a diminished chord, or F#b5, which I wouldn't recommend in a powerchord progression, however, the b7 is quite often used before the tonic, so using F5 to G5 would be fine, its used a lot in rock music

Also, to make a post so it doesn't sound like I'm trolling *I really wasn't, I Just wanted to clear that F#5 up*, generic progressions can be used, generally, I would use powerchords that give some tension, say, the singer is in C major, and hits B, maybe throw a F5, this could give a tritone sound, making it want to resolve. Other idea's I like is using sus chords. Sus chords sound great with some distortion, do a IV V vi with sus chords, itll sound great, and i use it a lot in my choruses
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Last edited by Zinnie at Jul 16, 2010,
#9
Quote by MapOfYourHead
^F#5 can be used in G major, it just borrows from the relative (melodic) minor.

touche, I just cant get it to sound good, thats why I recommended against it. of course, that doesn't mean TS could make it sound good. Sorry bout that
Schecter C-1 Classic in Seethru blue <333
Schecter Damien FR
Roland AC-60 acoustic amp
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Sigma Dx Acoustic
#11
Play the power chord that the vocals start on in each phrase. For example, if the vocals start on a C in measure 1, then play a C5, then if by measure 3 they're on a E, play an E5.

Or, have the vocals sing notes close to the power chord. If you're in the key of Eb and the chord is a C5, the vocals could sing the notes C Eb F Eb D Eb F Eb (as eighth notes), or something similar.
#12
Well I think the first thing you should note is that 99% of the time, the fifth (power) chords are just playing two notes of a larger chord. So an A5 chord may be major or minor, depending on the context of the song.

Now the larger chords (usually) have more than 2 notes, the most common being three - the root, the fifth and the third.

To determine what chords fit behind the vocal line, the first step would be to determine what key the song is in, and the associated scale that the vocal line is using. Once you have that, you can have access to a template of chords from which to choose.

As mentioned above, if the singer sings an A, and the song is in A minor, you could choose to place an A minor (or 5th) chord underneath - it's the root of the chord so it makes sense to fit. But easily as commonplace is playing a D minor in this context, as the A note is the fifth of D minor and would still fit in within the context of the key of A minor. Same goes for thirds. A is the third of F major in the key of A minor, so you could also choose to play an F major or 5th chord in its place.
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