#1
Yo, everyone.

Today, my E-string happened to break, and I need to replace it.
I've heard that you can get someone to change the strings for you at like, a guitar store, but how do I do that, do I just go up to the counter and tell them to change my strings?
And how much would that cost me?

Help plox..
#2
It's really not that difficult, there's plenty of tutorials (even video tutorials on youtube) that'll help you out, and won't cost you anything. Though i'm sure most guitar shops'll gladly do it for you, or help you do it yourself. Whether they'll charge or not might vary.

You'll have to learn how to at some point :]
#4
Quote by KaitoNyappy
t how do I do that, do I just go up to the counter and tell them to change my strings?


Have you never interacted with another person or something? Perhaps never been into a shop?

Just do it yourself if you can't handle the complexities of speaking to a shopkeeper.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_kwR2rLVL48
Last one on drugs is a queer.
#5
Quote by pete-c
It's really not that difficult, there's plenty of tutorials (even video tutorials on youtube) that'll help you out, and won't cost you anything. Though i'm sure most guitar shops'll gladly do it for you, or help you do it yourself. Whether they'll charge or not might vary.

You'll have to learn how to at some point :]



Okay...So if I'd get a shop to do it for me, do I just leave my bass there, and get it the next day, or what?..o.o how does it work?
#6
its really not that difficult someone already put alink here click on it
#7
they change te string in like 1 minute, then charge you 10 bucks (at least) for something that you could do yourself for free.
#8
Changing strings isnt a complex nor taxing job to do :S just look at some tutorials on how to do it and your golden being honest its not much harder than hooking up a telly to a PS3, or tying your shoe laces.

It will become second nature and its a skill you should really be learning no matter what, as most shops will most likely charge for it aswell altho i dont think most wont.
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#9
Those strings must be pretty old if you managed to break the E string for a bass. Might as well change them all and start fresh. And like everyone else said, learn to do it yourself. It's the simplest thing you'll learn about guitars. And should take about 5 minutes to change all the strings once you've learned and had some practice
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#10
It's a valuable skill.

Once you learn how to do it you can be the guy in the guitar shop charging suckers a tenner for changing their strings.
#11
It's pretty much essential that you learn how to (properly) change your strings yourself. Not knowing how to do that is like buying a car without knowing how to put gas in it

Whether you decide to look for help from another person (say, at a guitar store like you suggested) or look up some vids on Youtube > that's up to you. Just remember these key things:

-Re-stringing your guitar is not something you should only do after one or several strings have snapped. It's no crime to restring your guitar when all the strings are still intact, even if it's only been like 2-3 months or so since you last restrung (people who play a LOT usually change their strings once a month, go figure). If your strings start feeling a little rusty or going out of tune quickly, don't wait until they all start to break. And if you're about to play a gig or practice/play with or for someone, keep in mind that gigging with old strings is pretty much asking for trouble

-"Lock" your strings. This one's REALLY useful:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ae7HsWFRdYY

-See how the guy measures the amount of slack you should leave on your string (3 fingers max)? That's rather important too: if you don't want your strings to go out of tune all the time, be sure not to wrap ALL of the excess string around the peg > the more string you use, the more opportunity you're providing for your string to stretch out (thus going flat...). After you're done changing all the strings (and tuning them up to the correct pitch + removing the excess string), stretch 'em. That way they won't go out of tune that easily:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umqzdp4qHTs

Last but not least: keep in mind that the neck on your guitar needs to be under constant tension. If you switch to thicker or thinner strings, if you tune your strings up or down, if you remove them all at the same time, cut them with a pair of pincers without de-tuning your strings first, etc. the amount of tension will change, and if these changes are too drastic that might the playability of your guitar (because necks are, after all, made of wood, which means they will bend over time, even if you DO treat your guitar with lots of care).

So in order to prevent that, don't take off every string at the same time > remove 1 string at the time, install the new one and tune it up to pitch. Do this for every string and you'll be fine. Of course you're sometimes gonna have to remove all the strings at once (for example, if you wanna clean your neck or if you wanna make some adjustments to the bridge), but if you don't leave your guitar like that for too long it'll probably be fine...

Have fun!

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Last edited by shwilly at Jul 16, 2010,