#1
Anyway to sound proof a room cheap with out the special foam
The time I burned my guitar it was like a sacrifice. You sacrifice the things you love. I love my guitar.
Jimi Hendrix
#2
ive heard egg cartons work, havent tried it though. maybe blankets and styrofoam as well.
"yeah, well, you know...


that's just like... your opinion man."


-The Dude, His Dudeness
#3
the egg carton might me hard to do but blanket would probably muffle the sound ill give it a try thanks
The time I burned my guitar it was like a sacrifice. You sacrifice the things you love. I love my guitar.
Jimi Hendrix
#4
For sound proofing, egg cartons don't do squat. What they will do is help control reflections, so if your room has lots of reflective surfaces, egg cartons will help manage those, as they can wreak havoc on a recording space.

There is no such thing as cheap soundproofing. It's complicated, and it's expensive. Anything that does not match that description is going to be dodgy at best.

Essentially, soundproofing comes down to a simple formula:

mass + insulation (even air space is fine) + mass = soundproof. The effectiveness of this equation is dependent upon how much mass you have, and how air-tight the air space is.

Generally, what is done to soundproof a space is to build a room within the room such that the floor, walls and ceilings are not connected to the outer floor, walls or ceiling with anything that will transfer vibration.

The "outer room" will have studs placed not against the wall, but in from the wall a little bit. The wall frames and floor of the "inner room" will be elevated and placed on dense absorptive foam rubber or similar material. The "inner room" will also be connected to the ceiling of the outer room with a similar kind of material. The "inner room" will be constructed with drywall or something - maybe double-thickness - placed on *both* sides of the studs. This gives you an airspace between the two layers of drywall, and an air space between that and the outer room.

The studs for the walls will also typically be offset from one another so that the outer wall and the inner wall do not touch - almost like one frame for the outer part of the wall and another frame for the inner part of the wall.

Think of this... you know that old trick with the tin cans and the string where the sound travels along the string? Well, you can sound-proof the sh!t out of your walls and ceiling, but the sound will travel along the floor across the joists and follow the joists to the outside. Similarly, if your inner room and outer room are connected... say... the screws for the drywall going into the studs, and then those same studs touching the outer layer of drywall, you have the potential for sound transference from the inside to the outside.

Think of this too.... sound travels through the air in waves. That means that if air can get out, then logic says that sound can get out. No prob.... just block off all the air holes with enough mass and insulation and enough mass again to absorb all the sound waves. Er... wait a sec..... but if air can't get out.... how can it get in? Ooops.

Oh, the egg cartons.... the reason they don't work.... practically no mass! And they typically get installed such that they touch the walls, so sound travels through them to the wall and to the outside.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
^ best post you will ever get on this topic, he knows his shit
5150 III 100W, Mesa 4x12 Cab, Framus Cobra Cab, M-Audio Profire 610, ISA One Pre, SC607-b, Equator D5's, Countryman Type 85 Di box, Radial JCR, Superior Drummer, SSD 4 Ex, TS9, NS-2 and the list goes on and on
#6
^ best post you will ever get on this topic, he knows his shit about people who know their shit
#8
thanks axeman so how much would all this cost including the outer room and inner room
The time I burned my guitar it was like a sacrifice. You sacrifice the things you love. I love my guitar.
Jimi Hendrix
#10
I started researching all this stuff for our garage when we bought our house. It's block and brick construction. I think I got to about $3000 in my planning stage - that's just materials, as I planned on doing the bulk of the work myself - and then discovered the whole "if air can't get out, then air can't get in" idea.

At that point, it got really complicated, and life took a turn, and the plan has been shelfed.

Two GREAT resources for this:

http://www.johnlsayers.com/ - This guy designs pro studios into the 100's of thousands of dollars. There is a link to the forum on his home page where people discuss soundproofing and the like. It is VERY good.

http://www.amazon.com/Home-Recording-Studio-Build-Like/dp/1598630342

This book is the BIBLE when it comes to building a home studio. The author, Rod Gervais, incidentally posts frequently at the above forum. It is a great book. I have it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#11
Do you think it would be cheaper just to go to a studio or in the long run a home studio
The time I burned my guitar it was like a sacrifice. You sacrifice the things you love. I love my guitar.
Jimi Hendrix
#12
Short term, go to a studio if you want professional quality done. Just try to get the tracking and recording done there, and if you have any knowledge of mixing, do it yourself. The thing is that after you've built the place, you still need to set up the place with electricity and equipment, and after spending so much on it, why buy sh*t stuff to put in it? In essence, you're going to spend on a place to house a studio before actually having a studio. Go somewhere professional, save up, build your own. Its not exactly economical, but you don't have to pay to be in your own home, and you don't exactly need to be put on a wait list/be in a time crisis and need to push for material.
#13
thanks i will look into both methods see what works best
The time I burned my guitar it was like a sacrifice. You sacrifice the things you love. I love my guitar.
Jimi Hendrix
#14
I'm wondering if by sound proofing you mean acoustic treatment or indeed sound proofing..
If you want to stop the sound getting out of the room and annoying your family, then yeah sound proofing.. but if you just want your room to sound nicer that is a totally different game.

For making the room sound nicer the big problems are bass response, reverb time, and early reflections.

Bass is the hardest problem to fix but the best trick I have for that is to put big ROLLS of carpet in the corners of the room sitting on top of a milk crate. The big heavy mass of the rolled up carpet helps to trap the bass. If you put it on a milk crate the sound can pass through the centre which stops it from resonating and creating a bigger problem.

Reverb time is easily fixed by adding padded things around the room. couches, curtains.. whatever you can find that will absorb sound. This ties in with reflections. any big reflective surfaces are going to cause a problem, so cover them.. with curtains or book shelves. book shelves help scatter the sound.. curtains will absorb it.

Where to put the curtains?
Imagine the walls are made of mirror. Sit in the listening position and look to where you would be able to see a reflection of the speakers in the mirror. This is where the early reflections are coming from. If you put a curtain in those spots it will make a big difference.

hope this makes sense.. shout out if it doesn't..
#15
okay, so we can't afford pro soundproofing, and we've applied a few inexpensive tricks from above. back to the original questiion- i know it wont be perfect but we still like to krank up without attracting the cops. what can be done cheaply to reduce the amount of noise heard from outside a room without $major construction (short of being quieter)?
-Your shadow of doubt.
Last edited by phuckoph at Aug 9, 2010,
#16
Quote by phuckoph
what can be done cheaply to reduce the amount of noise heard from outside a room without $major construction (short of being quieter)?


in a word : nothing

"soundproof" and "cheap" do not belong in the same sentence together.

its the unfortunate reality of sound.
#17
You could try carpeting the walls. My local studio do it and when my band finish a practise session we don't come out with ringing ears, unlike other places.
#18
what about layering the walls? say rubber, then carpet, then eggshell foam? would that make anyting cool happen?
-Your shadow of doubt.
#20
damn.. guess i gotta bring all this back to costco..
-Your shadow of doubt.
#21
I've been thinking about lining the walls of my bedroom with paper egg trays. They do block sound, you can tell by holding it in front of your ear. But this will only be to stop echo and stuff in the room. Would this work? I don't care about sound leaking outside as I only have one room to work with.
#22
Quote by jman007_93
I've been thinking about lining the walls of my bedroom with paper egg trays. They do block sound, you can tell by holding it in front of your ear. But this will only be to stop echo and stuff in the room. Would this work? I don't care about sound leaking outside as I only have one room to work with.


Even in the role of providing Diffusion or Absorption, egg crates perform very poorly.
This most persistent of audio myths seems to be based entirely on the shape of the egg crates resembling the foam used in some studios.

in short, no, egg crates are not a good solution.
#24
Quote by jman007_93
What about considering the cheap price it would cost to do so? Then is it worth it, just to stop reverberation?

Don't have the time to write much here, but to answer while other people are away: Think of it this way... egg boxes will affect the sound in the room, but due to their mass will do sweet f.a to the low end of the frequency spectrum, which is probably the biggest problem with sound in small rooms (i.e not proper recording studios). Bass response will be unaffected, and with additional altering of the high-end thanks to the egg boxes, modal issues and standing waves in the room will be the same or even more noticeable.

In short, it will make the room sound worse and won't provide any useful acoustic treatment OR sound proofing.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#25
Quote by jman007_93
What about considering the cheap price it would cost to do so? Then is it worth it, just to stop reverberation?

eggs arent exactly cheap my man. and you'll be eating omellets for months to have enough egg cartons to cover a room. probably less expensive than using actual acoustic foam, but the time and price difference isnt worth it. especially when you consider how little it does.

some dude made a thread recently on making bass traps for not an absurd cost. search for that and check it out.
#26
wait. wouldn't a walk in closet with lots of cloths in it work?
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