#1
Okay so I know like everybody does this, so sorry lol. But I need help on what to practice and how to work on some things. I know in the end everything comes down to practice, but I wanna know if you guys have any tips for some of the things I wanna learn.

Right now I'm primarily a rythym guitarist, though I do know some lead parts and some riffs. I'd like to become a better overall lead player, so any tips would be appreciated. I also want to learn how to play pinch harmonics better, and once again I know that that requires lots of practice, but I was just wondering if you guys had any excersises in particular.

It being summer and all I have pretty much all day to practice, so the time I have to practice isn't an issue.
#2
Well, you really need to learn which scales sound good with each chord, if you want to be a lead guitarist.

For pinch harmonics I use a downstroke and have only a little bit of the pick hitting the string, than I push my thumb into the string hard... This often works, but not always. i've been looking for some help also.
#3
Yeah I've been trying to work on that. Scales and arepeggios come easy to me but I have trouble applying them.
#4
^then they don't come easily..

yeah learn how chords and scales are related to eachother. then apply. your playing will skyrocket in a month or two. and it's not something that just clicks, you need to spend a lot of time on it!
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#5
I wouldn't go straight into scales, I'd just learn some classic rock solo licks, listen to AC/DC or Zeppelin and learn all the kinda 'blues-cliche' licks the use all the time. That's the best place to start, not getting bogged down by scales.
#6
Quote by Blurry 505
^then they don't come easily..

yeah learn how chords and scales are related to eachother. then apply. your playing will skyrocket in a month or two. and it's not something that just clicks, you need to spend a lot of time on it!


I meant I remember them easily and I find them easy to play, unlike some people I hear of. And I was wanting help with the applying part That's one thing I was wondering if you guys had some tips for...

And Rose that's kinda what I have been doing...
#7
Quote by Ultrahuntr
I meant I remember them easily and I find them easy to play, unlike some people I hear of. And I was wanting help with the applying part That's one thing I was wondering if you guys had some tips for...

And Rose that's kinda what I have been doing...

Well, learning the shapes and locations of the scales is one thing. Learning how each note sounds over different harmonies and amongst endless phrases is an entirely different thing.

To put it simply. You have to really LEARN and APPLY the scales from your brain to the guitar. You have to listen to what is happening and let your brain tell you where to go. This takes time and patience. You must start with simple phrases (one, two, maybe three notes chosen deliberately).

It will be a slow process, but you'll start to feel AND hear your way around the guitar if you stay focused.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
Last edited by hockeyplayer168 at Jul 17, 2010,
#8
Quote by Ultrahuntr
And I was wanting help with the applying part That's one thing I was wondering if you guys had some tips for...


Applying them can work many ways. Here's the most effective ways (for me anyway)

1. Standards. pick a jazz standard, and work through the progressions. But not chordwise, learn the scales that go with the chords and do that. Emphasize the correct notes, etc.

2. Any music you play. Best way to learn music is to play along with it. So do that, but instead of playing the chord progression and solos, solo the entire time over it outlining the chords as you go. Great way to apply it. And if the guitarist is pretty good, you can see how he / she applied it to that song specifically.

If you're not into jazz (like me, I am just kinda forced to learn it), go with option #2. The progress will be fantastic!

Does this help you a little bit?
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#9
Quote by hockeyplayer168
Well, learning the shapes and locations of the scales is one thing. Learning how each note sounds over different harmonies and amongst endless phrases is an entirely different thing.

To put it simply. You have to really LEARN and APPLY the scales from your brain to the guitar. You have to listen to what is happening and let your brain tell you where to go. This takes time and patience. You must start with simple phrases (one, two, maybe three notes chosen deliberately).

It will be a slow process, but you'll start to feel AND hear your way around the guitar if you stay focused.


That helps me understand it better, thanks. One problem I think I have though is that I only play by myself. I don't have a band or anybody to play with.
#11
You need any other help come back. I was the guy you learned all the theory, but didn't apply it immediately as I was learning it. So I had to play catch up. Don't let that happen.
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#13
Quote by Ultrahuntr
That helps me understand it better, thanks. One problem I think I have though is that I only play by myself. I don't have a band or anybody to play with.

That's fine. You can improvise over any song.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.