#1
For the last few years, my band's been rehearsing in an unused shed (one of the advantages of living on a farm - no issues making too much noise, either). However, it's extremely cold during the winter, nigh-impossible to heat, and getting decent recordings done there isn't easy. So, the project for the next week or two - refurbish it.

Current plan is to put 3" of polystyrene on each wall, covered with about half an inch of waferboard, and put in a lower roof made from polystyrene sheets. We're also going to put a partition in about 2/3 of the way down the shed to isolate the mixing desk and other control devices, and give us a control room of sorts (the walls around it will be covered in rock wool, rather than the waferboard). Add new lights, redo the electrics, put down some carpets, and we'll hopefully have a more comfortable and better-sounding place to rehearse.

Will have pictures as soon as possible.

Any advice/questions/recommendations?
#2
depends on how big your band is go rent a storage room thats what we do hell you cant beat it we all put in the money to rent it and at nite theres no one around so we jammmm
#3
All I want to say is, keep us updated and take pics. I'm interested in this project of yours.
#4
I assume the polystyrene sheets are used for soundproofing and I really don't know much about that but I googled and found this:

"Extruded polystyrene foam (XPS) and expanded polystyrene foam (EPS), commonly used for thermal insulation, are significant conductors of sound. Polystyrene use as a sound damper should be avoided except in applications where moisture resistance and buoyancy is necessary"

Maybe it helps, maybe it don't.

One tip though I know works is this: make your rehearsal studio a very comfortable place. It's common sense but very important if you are to spend a long time in the studio. A fridge, a sofa and of course proper heating.
#5
put curtain rails on each wall and hang big thick curtains up. they'll help control the sound and they'll look cool
#6
I assume the polystyrene sheets are used for soundproofing and I really don't know much about that but I googled and found this:

"Extruded polystyrene foam (XPS) and expanded polystyrene foam (EPS), commonly used for thermal insulation, are significant conductors of sound. Polystyrene use as a sound damper should be avoided except in applications where moisture resistance and buoyancy is necessary"


They're more for heat insulation, actually - we don't have to worry about disturbing anyone, the nearest neighbour is 400 yards away.


put curtain rails on each wall and hang big thick curtains up. they'll help control the sound and they'll look cool


We might well do this - depends how the room sounds with the waferboard as the wall covering. From experience, putting drums in a room with waferboard on the walls gives them a nice aggressive sound, but some degree of trial and error will be required to see how it makes the other instruments deal with it.
#7
If you're adding a wall, don't make it square to the wall it is opposite. Recording spaces should avoid parallel walls so you don't get standing waves. Also you may want to experiment with how much foam and carpet you put around. You don't want the room to be too dead.
#8
Quote by inkandlead
If you're adding a wall, don't make it square to the wall it is opposite. Recording spaces should avoid parallel walls so you don't get standing waves. Also you may want to experiment with how much foam and carpet you put around. You don't want the room to be too dead.


although as soon as you put things in a room (such as couches, amps, instruments, drum kit, people) it changes the dynamics of the room and the way the sound travels. so you are alot less likely to get standing waves. and in a non-square room you are also more likely to get spots where the bass pools.

so whilst yes this is true, i dont think it would be a problem
#9
Now with some pictures!

Back wall, part of the side walls covered with polystyrene/waferboard. You can see in the foreground the frame we're building to put in a partition wall.


Closeup of the wall covering


The roof - just polystyrene for now, may either paint it or add a layer of thin wood for protection if necessary.


Picture of the existing roof - not a good acoustic environment.



The current cost of the whole rebuilding process, minus labour, has been roughly £11, as we got the polystyrene free and already had the waferboard. Need to buy some more of the waferboard today, and find a double-glazed window for the control room.
#10
Update!

Now have the partition wall in, all the walls in the 'studio' bit covered, the ceiling in in the studio bit, and are ready to get to work on the control room.

A slight change of plans occurred - the wall material for the studio is waferboard on the back wall and half of the side walls (around the drumkit) and plasterboard on the partition wall and half of the side walls. Plasterboard was cheaper, and turned out was easier to work with.

Window glass waiting to be put in (the window between the studio and control room is quadruple-glazed and has a 2" air gap in the middle - the glass came from a greenhouse).



Partition wall from the control room, prior to adding of sound insulation.



Polystyrene sheets going on the wall in the studio, to be covered with plasterboard.



Partition wall from the studio side.



Rock wool being installed in the partition wall, to deaden the sound. This stuff is remarkably effective, you can tell the difference even before the door is installed. It does have a rather nasty downside, however, which is that the fibres make my skin itch abominably, so I avoided doing any of this work.



The right-hand wall and ceiling, complete with ceiling prop, in the studio.




I reckon two more days of work will see it complete - we have walls and a ceiling to put in the control room, skirting board to put around the edges in the studio, a bit of painting to tidy up the studio, running cables and electricity sockets, and general tidying. But it's going well.
#12
Nice boots

I wrote a guide on this. Soundproofing.
It's on UG, in this forum.
Look for it in the GB&C Essential links.
It has pretty much all the info needed for soundproofing.
..I was watching my death.
#13
thats looking great id love to just have a place to krank it.
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#14
Hah, the picture isn't of me, that's my brother, our drummer.


I wrote a guide on this. Soundproofing.
It's on UG, in this forum.
Look for it in the GB&C Essential links.
It has pretty much all the info needed for soundproofing.


Yeah, I've looked through it. The partition wall (the only one that needs to be truly soundproof) is built roughly as you suggest - double layer of plasterboard, wooden frame, sound deadening material inside, and another layer of plasterboard on the other side. We're in quite an unusual position as far as home studios go - we don't need to worry too much about sound escaping, it's just a question of creating a good sonic atmosphere inside the room.

Have you any experience with building your own doors for such projects? It's looking likely that this is what we'll be doing - basically it'll be made of the same materials as the wall, but on hinges.
#15
Quote by Samzawadi


Have you any experience with building your own doors for such projects? It's looking likely that this is what we'll be doing - basically it'll be made of the same materials as the wall, but on hinges.


If you don't care about looks,
Put some Sound Proofing drywall on both sides. This should emulate the effect of your wall.

The more costly way is to
A)Get Solid Core Doors. Solid wood is a much better sound insulator that those cheap hollow ones. You could even make your own.
B)Get sound insulated doors. It's pretty much a hollow door, but pumped with sound insualtion. I have no idea hw you would mod your door to be like this.
..I was watching my death.