#1
1) Since there are like 4 fingers and 2 main ways you can do vibrato (pushing up or pulling down), you need to practice 8 different ways to vibrato? If one includes bending vibrato with all 4 fingers, which also has 2 main ways (pushing up and pulling down), that would mean a total of 16 ways to practice rock vibrato?

Okay minus pinky, thats a total of 12 ways. This isn't including exotic vibrato like slide vibrato and whammy bar vibrato. So guys like Yngwie Malmsteen and George Lynch practiced ALL these ways to get their great vibrato?

2) If one can't bend a note to a certain pitch but he wants to achieve this range with his vibrato, should the player force it? Or should he focus on concentrating on the motion and relaxation with a smaller range first?

Sorry if this came out rather confusing, I'm just desperate to get good vibrato.
#2
Vibrato is overrated anyway, dude.


And, no, you don't technically have to practice all of these ways.
I'm not really sure how being able to vibrato with four fingers at the same time would be useful.
#3
You don't really need to practice vibrato for each individual finger. It's mainly all in the wrist.
#4
i'm pretty sure these guys didn't sit down and practice on each finger with thier vibrato. Coming straight from Yngwie Malmsteen "If it sounds good, it's good". So just use ur ears, vibrate to the perfect pitch at the perfect time (hahaha) and you'll hear it. Do this enough times, it'll become muscle memory.

If you can't bend to the pitch you want, u either don't have enough finger strength OR your guitar just wont let you bend that much (vintage fenders are very limited). In either case u could use ur whammy bar (if you have one), if not... a whammy pedal. If that can't do it... ur gunna snap a string hahaa.

But seriously, ur ears are the best tool for learning, teach them good, and if it sounds good... it's good.

Toodles!
- Ibanez S470 (2004)
- late 70's vintage Fender Stratocaster (USA)
- VOX VT100 Amp
- Digitech Whammy Pedal
- Weeping Demon Wah Pedal
- Visual Sound Volume Pedal
- MXR Micro Amp
#5
Good vibrato, no matter what technique you use to do it, is all about control.

Lots of people just randomly shake or bend the string as fast as they can with no rythm to it at all. T

he best tip I ever recieved was just slow it down and make it in rythm with the piece you're playing. Make it as smooth and in time as possible with the rest of the song instead of wanking at it. Also bend/twist at the wrist, don't use your fingers to do it and you'll have far far more control.

Hope this helps some!
Last edited by iduno871 at Jul 17, 2010,
#6
not quite, on the high E string you'd always bend up, NEVER down because it'd push it off the fretboard. Get good at vibrato with the 3rd finger (with the other two fingers behind it first), that's the strongest way to get the most control behind your vibrato
#7
When we talk about rock vibrato, it's generally assumed you're bending the EBG strings up and the EAD strings down, although the middle strings can go either way.

I'd suggest getting confident with ring finger vibrato, then index, then middle and pinky. Up/Down doesn't make that much difference.
#8
Vibrato isn't overrated. In fact it's underrated.
It's all in the wrist, but you should practice doing vibrato with each finger, meaning it should still be coming from the wrist but you still need to know how to do it with each finger.
#10
Quote by Timothongz
Thanks for replies. How long every day should I spend working on vibrato?

It depends how bad you are at it. The worse you are, the more time you spend.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfVZXRefVZQ
#11
Quote by Timothongz
Thanks for replies. How long every day should I spend working on vibrato?


As much time as you feel like you need. Personally I haven't really spent time working on vibrato on it's own, just make sure you're listening and paying attention every time you use it and you should be ok in my opinion.
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#12
Is it fine to take a more mechanical approach towards vibrato? For example, I practice my vibrato speed with a metronome and altering between different note values (quarter,8th,16th, triplets), and I practice attaining pitch with a tuner? I figured this would probably help my control and relaxation more, rather than just hearing and practicing normally without any aid.
#13
Quote by Timothongz
Is it fine to take a more mechanical approach towards vibrato? For example, I practice my vibrato speed with a metronome and altering between different note values (quarter,8th,16th, triplets), and I practice attaining pitch with a tuner? I figured this would probably help my control and relaxation more, rather than just hearing and practicing normally without any aid.


At first, but hearing the notes will help alot more. Ur method would be good for getting the feel and tuning ur ears, but you really have to feel a vibrato... it is an expressive technique after all.
- Ibanez S470 (2004)
- late 70's vintage Fender Stratocaster (USA)
- VOX VT100 Amp
- Digitech Whammy Pedal
- Weeping Demon Wah Pedal
- Visual Sound Volume Pedal
- MXR Micro Amp
#14
Quote by Timothongz
Is it fine to take a more mechanical approach towards vibrato? For example, I practice my vibrato speed with a metronome and altering between different note values (quarter,8th,16th, triplets), and I practice attaining pitch with a tuner? I figured this would probably help my control and relaxation more, rather than just hearing and practicing normally without any aid.

Yeah that will help get it very smooth. Also practice bending in half and whole steps and whatnot.
You don't really need a tuner though. A metronome will do. Just play, for example, the 8th fret G string, then practice your vibrato on the 7th fret bending up to that pitch of what 8 sounded like.
#15
I've never actually spent any time consciously "working on my vibrato." I have just vibrato'd pretty much every note I can, throughout all my playing in general, and I probably consider it one of my strong points in technique. However, different approaches probably work for different people.
#16
And lets not forget horizontal vibrato (where you press the string to the left and right to subtly alter the pitch) and from there you can springboard into circular vibrato which is one of the most wide and slow/washy vibratos you can get.

Practice it all, go through the motions, don't even think of it in terms of 'how much practice should I put into it..' but keep practicing until you are happy with your playing ability, thats really all there is to it.
#17
I was glancing through Steve Vai's website a while ago and saw this http://www.vai.com/LittleBlackDots/84/vibrato.html

Actually all the little mini-lessons he has on there are sort of cool. But the vibrato one helped me quite a bit, that was the first time I learned there were different kinds of vibrato. Personally, I have never "practiced" vibrato. It's just something I do. If it sounds cool, then you're doing it right.