#1
Recently I have been delving into theory. I wrote out all the modes into movable boxes so I can apply them in any key. I have two questions: am I correct in applying them, for example, g Dorian over f major? Secondly, can anyone provide examples of progressions/other instaces where scales like the harmonc minor would work. Thank you in advance.
#2
no. by playing g dorian over f major, you are essentially playing f major, and wont hear the overall quality of the dorian mode. try playing g dorian in the key of Gm instead, you'll see.

harmonic minor works in place of generally any minor scale or key, so any progression a minor scale would work, a harmonic minor would as well.
My Gear:
Gibson Faded Flying V
"Dante's Inferno" Iceman
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe 112
etc.




Quote by freedoms_stain
I can't imagine anything worse than shagging to Mark Knopfler.

Maybe shagging Mark Knopfler, but that's about it.
#3
G Dorian over F major really wouldn't do much for the listener unless you clearly define the new tonic note.
One good application of Dorian to a minor mode I know of is the jazz classic 'So What' by Miles Davis.
D Dorian for 16 bars to Eb Dorian for 8, to D Dorian for 8.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEC8nqT6Rrk
It's like Superman reading the teachings of Jesus. The two greatest musicians on Earth hath combined forces. I officially quit music, as it has reached it's zenith with that cover.
#4
Quote by TK1
no. by playing g dorian over f major, you are essentially playing f major, and wont hear the overall quality of the dorian mode. try playing g dorian in the key of Gm instead, you'll see.

harmonic minor works in place of generally any minor scale or key, so any progression a minor scale would work, a harmonic minor would as well.


if the g Dorian over f won't work, can you give me a "rule of thumb" on applying modes?
#5
Quote by TK1
no. by playing g dorian over f major, you are essentially playing f major, and wont hear the overall quality of the dorian mode. try playing g dorian in the key of Gm instead, you'll see.

harmonic minor works in place of generally any minor scale or key, so any progression a minor scale would work, a harmonic minor would as well.


no.

by playing G dorian over F major, you are playing F major. if you play the pattern of G dorian over F major but resolve on F, you are playing in F major.

if you play "G dorian" in the key of G minor, you are simply playing G minor with an accidental (E natural). how about playing G dorian over a chord progression or vamp in G dorian?

Quote by GreenDayFan16
if the g Dorian over f won't work, can you give me a "rule of thumb" on applying modes?


sure. apply modes when the progression is modal. if the progression is in F major, modes are irrelevant - you simply play F major. if you have a very obviously modal progression or vamp (i.e. Em-Fmaj; obviously in E phrygian), then you apply modes.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jul 17, 2010,
#7
Quote by AeolianWolf
no.

by playing G dorian over F major, you are playing F major. if you play the pattern of G dorian over F major but resolve on F, you are playing in F major.

if you play "G dorian" in the key of G minor, you are simply playing G minor with an accidental (E natural). how about playing G dorian over a chord progression or vamp in G dorian?

sure. apply modes when the progression is modal. if the progression is in F major, modes are irrelevant - you simply play F major. if you have a very obviously modal progression or vamp (i.e. Em-Fmaj; obviously in E phrygian), then you apply modes.
There you go, TS.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea