#1
is chord tone soloing the right way to solo?
can only play the notes of the cchord? or do i have other options?]\
whats the right way to use chord tones in solos?
#2
theres no rigth way to solo
the general rule of thumb is you can play what you want if it sounds good
you could use a bit of theory to learn good solo techniques there are many lessons on this website for that
#3
There is no right and wrong, this is music.

I think people tend to aim to reach a note in the chord when the chord change takes place, but it'd be boring to ONLY play notes from the chord... that said, it's also boring to always hit a chord note every time a chord changes.
#4
The best way, in my opinion, is to start on the 3rd of the first chord, and follow a common scale in which all chords belong.

Example:
Gm - A# - Dm - F
This chord progression works well in both D minor and G minor. G minor scale is a sfool:
G - A - A# - C - D - D# - F
The 3rd of this scale, is A#, so I'll start playing A#.

If you don't already know scales, get to know them. Learn the HEPTATONIC SCALES, and NOT the pentatonic scales.
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#5
easiest way to figure out what chord tone soloing sounds like is by playing blues.

when the chords change to the IV chord, hit the 3rd of it.

EG. Blues in E, when the chord changes to A, play a phat C#

then you will be godlike
#6
Quote by sfaune92
Gm - Bb - Dm - F
This chord progression works well in both D minor and G minor. G minor scale is a sfool:
G - A - Bb - C - D - Eb - F
The 3rd of this scale, is Bb, so I'll start playing Bb.
Fixed.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Quote by mangoman13
is chord tone soloing the right way to solo?
can only play the notes of the cchord? or do i have other options?]\
whats the right way to use chord tones in solos?



Well, as an exercise you could practice just playing chord tones. People do this for the purpose of becoming familiar with where the chord tones are on the fretboard. (basically learning shapes). But it is just as exercise, not a style of soloing called "chord tone soloing" (VS non chord tone soloing).

Actual solos rarely (if ever) consist of only chord tones and nothing else.

What you want to do is learn about melodies . A good way to do this is to learn some existing melodies..... study them. play them, hear them, understand them.

When you've done ALOT of that..... .then move on to creating your own.


The "chord tone soloing" exercise will teach you where the chord tones are, but it doesn't teach you how to create melodies /how to create music.

My suggestion...

start with MUSIC.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 18, 2010,
#8
Chord tones are useful, but limiting if you isolate them.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#9
It's good to know how chord tones sound versus non chord tones. You can also imply a more complex chord by placing a non chord tone in a place where a chord tone is expected. For example, since chord tones are expected on the beat, you could make a G Major chord sound like a Gadd9 by playing an A on the beat.
i don't know why i feel so dry