#1
I have a friend who is double jointed. He's not interested in playing guitar, but I think if he did, he would have an advantage since his fingers are more flexible.
#2
I don't think it would make a whole not of difference to be honest, especially after years of playing.
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#3
theres no such thing as being double jointed. theres a condition called hypermobility which is just being able to move a joint back and forth farther than normal. so, no it wouldnt help with speed, the only thing it could really help with is reach.

Quote by Fj785
...his fingers are more flexible.



they cant move faster or anything like that, they just bend farther than normal and you arent bending your finger more than normal when you play guitar.
Last edited by rickyj at Jul 18, 2010,
#4
Quote by rickyj
theres no such thing as being double jointed. theres a condition called hypermobility which is just being able to move a joint back and forth farther than normal. so, no it wouldnt help with speed, the only thing it could really help with is reach.


This ^^^

Hypermobility, is often wrongly referred to as "Double Jointed". There is no mutation that makes the joints "Double", they are simply more flexible and possibly likely to cause problems in later life, because the tendons etc that hold everything in place will wear with age and make dislocating joints, very easy to do.
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#5
Two of my kids and my Brother In Law, can bend the tip of their fingers, without bending at any other joints...very weird. And can make their fingers bend backwards by a good way, all independently.
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#6
I've seen a number of players who could fret say, an "A" chord with one joint of the ring finger...They just have very flexible hands.
I've never had the luxury. However, I manage just fine....

Having comparatively long, flexible fingers can help in fingering certain complex or extended chords, but there are always other voicings of those chords that are easier for "normal" folks to finger.
#7
Quote by obeythepenguin
I can bend my thumb back at a nearly 90-degree angle, but I don't know how that could really help my playing. Still kind of a cool (and/or quite scary) trick.


If you're talking about that joint in the middle of your thumb, I can make it stand up at a 90 degree angle to the other part of my thumb. And as for the TS's question...I think Wes Montgomery actually had a similar 'condition' that I'm referring to, at least in the videos of him playing that I've seen....*looks for picture* Okay, I found a video instead.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOm17yw__6U around 2:03ish.

Whether or not this is healthy for you is a different question. When I play (although I don't pick with my thumb like that), I try not to have my thumb do that. It only really happens though when my thumb goes behind the neck, particularly on barre chords. I've realized since there are many who play guitar and can't do this, there's a way to do it more so correctly without using these hypermobility or whatever it may be.

However, other things that differ from person to person (IE Fingerlength, finger strength, finger size, body size, etc) may help or hinder somoene's ability to play.
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#8
Im double-jointed and I think it really messes with my playing due to the fact that my finger tips can bend when i want them too while causing the rest of my finger to stiffen, and my pinky sometimes gets locked into place while im playing