#1
I was wondering if there were any tried and true ways to easily and cleanly change keys in a chord progression other than playing th V7-I of the new key.
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#3
Quote by Mangohabs
secondary dominants, secondary leading-tone,

Secondary Dominants play the V (or V7) - I of the new key.

Common Chord modulation, where you find a common chord between two keys and use that to change between keys.

You could do something similar to the Pitch-Axis Theory and use that tone/chord and do it that way.

Play around... try and find clever ways yourself. Theory will only take you so far.
#5
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Theory will only take you so far.


i disagree. theory can take you just as far as your ear can -- but that's only if you know it well enough to understand the principles behind it.
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#6
Quote by AeolianWolf
i disagree. theory can take you just as far as your ear can -- but that's only if you know it well enough to understand the principles behind it.

I never specified as to what distance ;]

I think theory can take you as far as you need it to... but experimentation of new things needs to begin with the ear, and THEN use theory is what I was trying to say.
#7
you could do circle of fifths like you described.

or switch to the vi and modulate from there using modes.

or switch to parallel minors (ie G to Gm).

really it just depends on what you think sounds good.
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#8
Quote by griffRG7321
Try a Intterupted cadence.

So say your in A minor.

Am Dm Am/E E7 -> F#m


Could you explain this a little more?
"His name is Robert Paulson"
#9
Try listening to and analysing compositions from the Romantic era. There's some fantastic modulations in some of those pieces. Beethoven is a good one to start with.

Also, I'll try to explain that^
The chord progression Am-Dm-Am/E-E7 is a i-iv-i-V in A minor. An interrupted cadence is V-vi. So an interrupted cadence in Am is E7-F#m, changing key down from Am to F#m.
#10
Quote by Unlockitall
Could you explain this a little more?

In the USA it's called a Deceptive Cadence.

The reason it's called a Deceptive Cadence is because it deceives you. When you hear the i - iv - i - V you want to hear the i or I next. This is because of the leading tone present in the V. It drags our ears toward the i or I. If you'll notice though, the VI in Am contains two of the notes that are in our i: A and C. Our VI chord is F. It deceives us because we're expecting to hear the Am chord, but then out of nowhere we get an F chord leaving us resolved, but not done (it's a very weak cadence, only weaker one is the Half Cadence (I - V)).

If we make our progression Am - Dm - Am/E - E7 - F (not quite sure where Griff gets the F# from... he's gon' have to explain himself) we have our Deceptive Cadence in Am: i - iv - i - V7 - VI.

Having said all of this, it works a lot better in major (usually). A I - IV - I - V7 - vi REALLY has this very unifinished feel. A good song that uses this (that's on the radio!) would be Weezer's - (If you're wondering if I want you too) I want you too at 2:08ish when he says "my heart is blue" is when he hits the vi chord in his I - IV - V - vi progression. You effectively hear the I in your head but get "deceived" (or Interrupted, if that's your thing) when you hear the small amount of resolution the vi gives.
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Jul 19, 2010,
#11
The F#m comes from the relative major, I prefer it to a minor key interrupted cadence.
#12
Modulating using the dominant of another key is used a lot. I personally like using the pivot chord method, where you can find a common chord between the two keys (Say, In C major, play Cmaj Gmaj A Minor Fmaj (I V vi IV in C) and after that Fmaj, play maybe a Bbmaj (IV of F) or possibly Gmin (ii of F), it will hopefully sound ok *I personally haven't done that exact progression*. Another is using a pivot tone, or note. I wrote a song that uses a modulation from C# minor to G Minor, using A as my pivot. What I did was *I think* C#min F#Maj G#maj Amaj Amin7b5 *modulated to G) D7 Gmin. I believe the first two major chords may be off, but the modulation between the A chords is where it really matters haha. And one last one, used in quite a lot of popular songs is the whole step modulation, where they just move up the key one whole step, it sounds kinda triumphant. worth a shot
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#13
i messed around once with using the melodic minor scale and if i remember correctly i changed from Aminor to D#major. the melodic minor scale ascends and descends differently.
if you use the ascending part (1-2-b3-4-5-6-7) both when descending and ascending, its called the jazz minor scale (obviously, used in jazz), and the descending part is just the natural minor scale. messing around with the true melodic minor scale (ascending and descending differently) to make melodies over a minor progression can lead into a progression in a different key.
and then of course everything thats already been said sounds good, pivoting on the V chord works, mutating amajor chord into a minor chord or vise-versa, or moving the shapes you're using 1 half step up or down the fretboard (i havent used that last 1 yet, im not sure how efficient a method it is)
#14
Just to add some more shizz:

Augmented 6ths (1 3 #6) can be used to modulate. They are most commonly used on the b6 degree of the scale.

Lets take C major for example. Modulating to the dominant.

C F/A aug6 G.

People have mentioned pivot chords, a nice progression using a Neapolitan 6th (bIIb) as a pivot chord is this one.

in E:   I  bIIb

in a:       VIb      iio7b  V7 i


With the bIIb chord in E being chord VIb in A minor.
#15
Could someone give me an example of a song that changes key and uses modes all in the same song?? I would like to start hearing this with my ear and know what I am hearing...sure I have heard it before just never knew, could some one blatently point an instance of this out to me?
#16
Quote by PattyCakes
Could someone give me an example of a song that changes key and uses modes all in the same song?? I would like to start hearing this with my ear and know what I am hearing...sure I have heard it before just never knew, could some one blatently point an instance of this out to me?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitch_axis_theory I believe this may be what you're looking for.
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