#1
Hello UGers! This is my first post. Just for a short introduction, I'm Ivan from Croatia.

Okay, I know some people say anchoring is bad, and I personally don't do it, but is this bad? Well, bad, as in not correct, because not correct isn't necessary bad. I'm aware there are great guitarists that anchor, or do "stuff like that".

Basically, I hold my hand on the bridge. Not so close to the strings that it mutes them. I feel very comfortable with my hand there. The thing is, my friend has an electric guitar with a FR, and it definitely isn't good holding the hand there. I probably won't get a guitar with a FR, but still, I want to ask you guys.

This is the picture.



It may seem that I'm touching the strings, but I'm really not.

Thanks in advance!

Ivan
#2
For acoustic that's fine.

I would never hold an electric guitar like that though...It doesn't look like you'd have much control.
#3
It's not conventional, but if it works, I say go for it. It might lead to problems later on, especially if you do get a guitar with a different bridge. Also, using some techniques that are common for electrics, like tremolo picking, would probably be rather difficult holding your hand there.
#4
So, undecided? It's just that I feel so out of control when floating my hand (is it called that way?). I'll definitely get an electric guitar 'till the end of this summer, or maybe the year.

Here in Croatia, everything is expensive. I was thinking of this - http://www.jacksonguitars.com/products/products.php?group=Rhoads-Body&page=1&product=2910016344. I know it's not perfect, but I'm still really a beginner.

Also, I pick much faster when holding my hand on the bridge.
#5
Personally, I float my hand for rythm and anchor with my second, third, and fourth fingers while soloing (I guess you could call it floating your hand, I'm not sure if there is a word for it). Ordinarily I advise people to do what works for them, but I think if you did what you do now on an electric you will have significant problems.
#6
You should probably start avoiding it. Electric guitar has a lot of palm muting elements (depending on the style of music) so you may find it frustrating having to 'slide' your hand forward to mute the string when needed as opposed to simply dropping your palm on to the strings on demand.

It may seem unnatural at first, but within a week or two you'll be comfortable again and it's better in the long run.
#7
Okay, thanks guys. I'll start getting used to it right now. Also, my friend will borrow me that guitar with a FR, so it should be an even better getting-used-to period.