#1
Hi guys I think (hope) this is the right forum [as it mentioned improvisation]

Anyways, one of the things I REALLY need to work on is my rhythm, just playing along with others as I really never get the chance to, so obviously I want to try backing tracks

But I can never ever figured them out, I Just don't know what to play, I'll play a REALLY simple backing track and sit there tapping my foot and just yeah

So if anyone has any tips on how to play along, or just get into the mood or anything it would be greatly appreciated, thanks
#2
Honestly, the biggest thing to getting into the groove of things is to just... "feel" it. Just get into the groove. Bob your head, move a little... but of course you won't feel it if you don't like it.

One of the things that has helped my rhythm playing the most is learning songs. You HAVE to be on rhythm, or it sticks out like a sore thumb.

And, believe it or not, complex breakdowns are really good at getting you used to off-beat syncopation and stuff of that nature.
#3
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Honestly, the biggest thing to getting into the groove of things is to just... "feel" it. Just get into the groove. Bob your head, move a little... but of course you won't feel it if you don't like it.

One of the things that has helped my rhythm playing the most is learning songs. You HAVE to be on rhythm, or it sticks out like a sore thumb.

And, believe it or not, complex breakdowns are really good at getting you used to off-beat syncopation and stuff of that nature.



I think its better to say that I can get into the groove of things but I just can't get my playing into the groove of it =/

I can play on rhythm if I'm playing along with another guitar track playing the same part, but if you take that off then I find it a lot harder. Which is one of the reasons I want to start playing with more backing tracks

I'm not really into really Br00tal metal, so could I get an example of a "complex breakdown" preferably in standard =D
#4
Jamie Aebersold backing tracks are really popular with jazz artists, and come in nearly endless variations of various rhythmic situations. I highly recommend it, although some tracks can be a little stale, but it's nothing one can't work around.

I also suggest studying many styles/genres, each has very specific rhythm: bossa nova, salsa, bebop, charleston, swing, etc. you may have no interest in these genres, but learning how to comp over these rhythms will greatly increase your playing in all aspects.

Steve Lacy, a great soprano saxophonist, wrote how he practiced for hours on end playing the same phrase, 3 or 4 notes, and applying the beats of all kinds different rhythmic situations you could experience in life. I.e late for work, meditative walk, a poor swimmer beating the water, jumping up and down, riding a bike, etc etc.

edit: check out this essay by Steve Coleman, an alto saxophonist. It really opens your eyes up to the rhythms we see and experience in everyday life.

http://m-base.com/sweet_science.html
Last edited by Kick2theOvaries at Jul 21, 2010,