#1
If there are two Melodic Minor scales (ascending and descending), how do you improvise with it?
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#2
What do you mean by that?
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#3
Like if I'm improvising with the melodic minor scale. Would I have to use ascending melodic minor because descending is just natural minor?
Call me Andrew. It's my name.

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i fond God too, man! i sat next to him on the bus once. he told be the meaning of life and then gave me a pretzel. i can't remember what the meaning of live was, but it was a good pretzel, man!
#4
Quote by GoIrish668
Like if I'm improvising with the melodic minor scale. Would I have to use ascending melodic minor because descending is just natural minor?


well, obviously you'd have to use ascending melodic minor. if you used descending melodic minor, you wouldn't be using melodic minor, you'd be using natural minor.

remember this, though: just because you have to use ascending melodic minor doesn't mean you have to use melodic minor ascending.
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#5
My understanding of the melodic minor is you can use both scales, so you can get any type of minor sound you want: natural minor, dorian, harmonic minor, and melodic minor.
#6
you don't really improvise with the melodic minor scale. It says melodic in the name because the different notes are there to strenghten melodies, so use thos enotes whenever you want, if it sounds good and play a different pattern if it doesnt. Dozens of scales can be used over any chord progression really.
#7
if ur playing jazz (or pretty much any popular form of modern music) use the jazz minor scale, which is just the ascending part of melodic minor. when using the melodic minor in formal classical music, you have to be like a mathmetician. basically while you're improvising using the full scale, if you play 1 note and then play a lower note, make sure its in the natural minor scale (descending part), or if you play 1 note and then play a higher note, it should be in the jazz minor scale (ascending part).
edit: actually i was just taught the usual use of melodic minor by another member of this forum. he said that even in formal classical music, they usually use only the ascending portion. the difference between ascending and descending is more taught than used.
Last edited by TMVATDI at Jul 21, 2010,
#8
Quote by SKAtastic7770
you don't really improvise with the melodic minor scale.
I don't see why not. You use melodies when you improvise, so it's a good tool to use in order to eliminate the augmented second in the harmonic minor.

But on topic: You can use just the ascending form if you want.

The whole idea of the ascending and descending form is that when you're playing in a minor key you can use the natural 6 and 7 to make an ascending riff that resolves to the root resolve more strongly and melodically, then if you want to make the riff go somewhere else you can just revert back to the natural minor. It's not like melodic minor is a mode or something with implicit rules for usage. It's kind of just a melodic tool.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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Last edited by food1010 at Jul 21, 2010,