#1
Hello beautiful people. I got my first job and I wanted to get a new guitar.. long story short I ended up deciding upon a Strat (my budget is $1000 dollars) but then I found out Warmoth..

I began experimenting with bodies and colors.. and realized I could build my dream guitar with a bit more cash only.

Now I know that Warmoth built guitars sound as good as how they are put together, and I've never built a guitar before.

I know the problem would be putting the neck and body together, but what if I buy the standard 4 bolt neck? Is there any way to screw up with those? I mean.. it's just adjusting the 4 screws, right? if so, with that ruled out, is there anything else really hard that someone in my situation would not be able to handle? (installing a bridge, etc.) thanks for the help in advance and sorry for my english


Quote by a_hub10
I keep my Schecter in dropped D all the time, and i didn't buy an attachment of any kind.

Quote by CraftyTrickster
You should just tell the seller: ¡Boludo!
Last edited by haceteunosmates at Jul 20, 2010,
#2
So long as you got a range of screwdrivers, a drill and a soldering iron, you've got all the tools you need. I've put together quite a few Warmoth builds now without any problems, and I'm normally useless at this stuff! So long as you stick to the normal options, there is no reason for anything to go wrong.

The only thing I'd add is make sure you really know what you're ordering, especially when it comes to the neck specs. With a company like Warmoth it is very, very easy to spend a lot of money buying your ''dream'' neck but then find out it isn't that suitable for you after all once you've actually got the guitar together; and by that point it's too late and you've wasted your money. So double-check everything, try out lots of different guitars and try to write down what features suit you best so you can be sure that what you order will suit you. Getting the fret size wrong, the nut width wrong, the back contour wrong, the fretboard radius wrong, the wood wrong, the control layout wrong... any of these can become very expensive mistakes. Whenever I order anything from Warmoth or whenever any of my friends do I always do/tell them to do the same thing: write out the full order, then wait a week. Go back to it after a week and read through your order again with a fresh mind - double-check that everything is suitable for you, that you are sure you haven't possibly gotten anything wrong. Once you are 100% sure the guitar will turn out good for you, then place your order.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#3
^ + 1,000,000

That sounds like a great plan. I would be surprised if their necks didn't fit their bodies, although they have neck pocket and tenon measurements on their site.


████████████
████████████








RBY CYOA
#4
Quote by MrFlibble
So long as you got a range of screwdrivers, a drill and a soldering iron, you've got all the tools you need. I've put together quite a few Warmoth builds now without any problems, and I'm normally useless at this stuff! So long as you stick to the normal options, there is no reason for anything to go wrong.

The only thing I'd add is make sure you really know what you're ordering, especially when it comes to the neck specs. With a company like Warmoth it is very, very easy to spend a lot of money buying your ''dream'' neck but then find out it isn't that suitable for you after all once you've actually got the guitar together; and by that point it's too late and you've wasted your money. So double-check everything, try out lots of different guitars and try to write down what features suit you best so you can be sure that what you order will suit you. Getting the fret size wrong, the nut width wrong, the back contour wrong, the fretboard radius wrong, the wood wrong, the control layout wrong... any of these can become very expensive mistakes. Whenever I order anything from Warmoth or whenever any of my friends do I always do/tell them to do the same thing: write out the full order, then wait a week. Go back to it after a week and read through your order again with a fresh mind - double-check that everything is suitable for you, that you are sure you haven't possibly gotten anything wrong. Once you are 100% sure the guitar will turn out good for you, then place your order.


Cool. I was expecting a "you wont be able to do it" response

So what about the rest of the stuff? The neck plate, etc. etc. can all be purchased from them too?


Quote by a_hub10
I keep my Schecter in dropped D all the time, and i didn't buy an attachment of any kind.

Quote by CraftyTrickster
You should just tell the seller: ¡Boludo!
#5
Nah, we're about building stuff here in GB&C, not about discouraging people who want to try.

and to answer your question, Here is a link



████████████
████████████








RBY CYOA
#6
Ok this is getting pretty exciting. Do I need to buy the neck and body altogether?

What I mean is, is there any complications if I dont? (wood warping, etc.) Because otherwise I could buy the body one month, then the neck another month, etc. as I save the money.

And last but not least, the quality of the wood is good right?. With a proper set up, carefully built, good wood combinations, good mics, are there chances it'll sound just as good as any other guitar made by famous brands? Thanks!


Quote by a_hub10
I keep my Schecter in dropped D all the time, and i didn't buy an attachment of any kind.

Quote by CraftyTrickster
You should just tell the seller: ¡Boludo!
#7
One thing to remember with warmoth is that you should budget about $100 for a professional set up and possible fret leveling. They don't tell you on warmoth's website (obviously) but according to a luthier I met with today, they're notorious for having uneven/loose frets that need to be leveled before playing and the nuts rarely are perfect.

Personally, I lucked out, no loose frets and only a minor nut adjustment, and after a set up it plays amazingly (done by a luthier for $60). However, for both a set up and fret leveling, the cost is generally around $100.

EDIT: Oh, the truss rod also needs to be adjusted by a luthier after you get it b/c warmoth ships them slightly under-bowed so they don't warp during transit (or something like that).

EDITEDIT: Warmoth's wood quality is superb, take a look at the Warmoth Soloist in my sig, their standard wood quality is what most other manufacturers would advertise as "AAA" or "Select choice."
Last edited by Schism1985 at Jul 20, 2010,
#8
Quote by Schism1985
One thing to remember with warmoth is that you should budget about $100 for a professional set up and possible fret leveling. They don't tell you on warmoth's website (obviously) but according to a luthier I met with today, they're notorious for having uneven/loose frets that need to be leveled before playing and the nuts rarely are perfect.

Personally, I lucked out, no loose frets and only a minor nut adjustment, and after a set up it plays amazingly (done by a luthier for $60). However, for both a set up and fret leveling, the cost is generally around $100.

EDIT: Oh, the truss rod also needs to be adjusted by a luthier after you get it b/c warmoth ships them slightly under-bowed so they don't warp during transit (or something like that).

EDITEDIT: Warmoth's wood quality is superb, take a look at the Warmoth Soloist in my sig, their standard wood quality is what most other manufacturers would advertise as "AAA" or "Select choice."


I read that the fret leveling is usually required on necks made of anything else but maple, because maple necks are refinished after they insert the frets. Or something like that. But yeah, I had this in mind already.

So does it really matter if I buy the neck an leave it unstringed until I get the rest of the stuff? (say, 2-3 months?)


Quote by a_hub10
I keep my Schecter in dropped D all the time, and i didn't buy an attachment of any kind.

Quote by CraftyTrickster
You should just tell the seller: ¡Boludo!
#9
The only thing is, it would suck major huevos if you were to buy a neck, then later on decide you want something else. imho, it would be best to save up and get EVERYTHING at once. It'd be more fun cause you could complete the build all at once, and you wouldn't have to worry about complications leaving you with half a guitar. Also, you might just save on shipping. Of course, your money situation may be far more stable than mine ^^'
Art is Vice. You don't marry it legitimately, you rape it...
-Edgar Degas
#10
Ok thank you very much everyone for your help.

I'm thinking about the carved top soloist.

But for now, I need help with my actualy guitar. If you have time visit: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=24772852#post24772852

Help will be greatly appreciated.


Quote by a_hub10
I keep my Schecter in dropped D all the time, and i didn't buy an attachment of any kind.

Quote by CraftyTrickster
You should just tell the seller: ¡Boludo!
Last edited by haceteunosmates at Jul 21, 2010,