#1
It seems that some higher end guitars, mainly gibson les pauls, have thin nitrocellulose lacquer finish rather than thick polyurethan finish

I've heard that they are supposed to help the wood breath and make it come alive and all that good stuff, but I also heard that they are just royal pain to maintain;

I heard from many that when resting one on a guitar stand, the part of the guitar that comes in contact with the stand can be smudged if the stand is dark color and the guitar is in lighter color like white

I also heard that some polishing chemicals will actually melt the lacquer finish

And some tell me that your sweat is bad for the finish and can potentially damage it...
of course, not mentioning that it's very weak against humidity

so is it really that troublesome? how should I basically take care of it if I got one?
Guitars:
* Custom "does-it-all" Strat
*'12 James Tyler Studio Elite HD Burning Water (HSH)
* EVH Wolfgang Special Stealth HT
#2
I don't know much about any of this so don't regard my comment.

I personally would hate to have a guitar like that, bring on something I can beat up.
#3
Most people who prefer nitro finishes want a worn down look...

But if you insist on keeping it pristine there are guitar stands out there that are safe with nitro finishes...and I'm not sure, but I'd say there are maintenance products out there that are safe for it.
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#4
Nitro actually is flexible where a thick poly will just crack and chip off if you knock something.The dents in nitro can be repaired pretty simply with a bit of know how. But in the end if you treat your gear like shit no matter what the finish you will screw it up.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#5
I have a Highway One Tele and it has a nitro finish.

As long as you keep the surface clean its ok (clean it after you play).

I have a towel covering the rubber bit of the stand because I noticed that it can leave funny streaks sometimes.

I think its a bit easier to get scratched though, also it said in the booklet to protect it from sudden temperature changes (don't open the case just after brining it in from the cold) as it can crack the finish easily..
Last edited by N04h at Jul 21, 2010,
#6
Quote by thelax

I've heard that they are supposed to help the wood breath and make it come alive and all that good stuff,
True.

I heard from many that when resting one on a guitar stand, the part of the guitar that comes in contact with the stand can be smudged if the stand is dark color and the guitar is in lighter color like white
True. Twenty minutes on the wrong type of stand can stain a white nitro finish for life; cream and other colour finishes typically take half an hour or so to stain. Black finishes will technically stain too but you probably won't be able to see it.

I also heard that some polishing chemicals will actually melt the lacquer finish
True, but there's no reason to use any typical polishing substances on a guitar anyway.

And some tell me that your sweat is bad for the finish and can potentially damage it...
True, although it's good for an unfinished fretboard.

of course, not mentioning that it's very weak against humidity
Not true.

so is it really that troublesome?
Only if you're stupid.

how should I basically take care of it if I got one?
By not being stupid.


You know that you shouldn't leave one on a stand; you know you shouldn't dump it in chemical waste; you know you shouldn't throw it down your stairs; you know you shouldn't wash it off in the ocean. So long as you're not brain-dead, there is no reason to have any problems with a nitro finish.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
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#7
Gibson sells a polish specifically for Nitro that I've tried and like. As MrFlibble hints at, you don't need to polish very often, it's more important to wipe your guitar down after playing with a clean, lint free cloth (I use flannel but there are alternatives as well).
I second the "don't be a fool and store your guitar in a case, not on the stand" line of thought. If there were a "ten commandments" of guitar care this one would be up there. One careless accident or fall from a stand can snap the headstock off a LP and the UV damage, temperature changes etc are all mitigtaed by storing in a case.
Moving on.....
#8
^^+1 except i would have said "be smart", not, "don't be stupid."




my nitro strat looks the same as it did when i got it about 4 yrs ago.

just buy a guitar cloth, use that to wipe the guitar down after use and lay it on any stand to guitar contact points when storing.

ta-da.


^oh yeah, i use a nitro safe cleaner, once in a long while, if i feel like it.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


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#9
Some stands use some type of surgical tubing which is ok for normal paint but can have a chemical reaction with nitrocellulose finnishes, before buying one of these stands you should check that it´s ok for nitrocellulose painted guitars because it will f your guitar up.
#10
Quote by thelax
It seems that some higher end guitars, mainly gibson les pauls, have thin nitrocellulose lacquer finish rather than thick polyurethan finish

I've heard that they are supposed to help the wood breath and make it come alive and all that good stuff, but I also heard that they are just royal pain to maintain;

I heard from many that when resting one on a guitar stand, the part of the guitar that comes in contact with the stand can be smudged if the stand is dark color and the guitar is in lighter color like white

I also heard that some polishing chemicals will actually melt the lacquer finish

And some tell me that your sweat is bad for the finish and can potentially damage it...
of course, not mentioning that it's very weak against humidity

so is it really that troublesome? how should I basically take care of it if I got one?


Lots of things will MELT lacquer.....such as acetone, lacquer, lacquer thinner, etc.....

USE Virtuosso polish of a polish that says safe for lacquer...and you are good to go.
#11
ok... so I guess I just need to be careful and just not treat the guitar like sh*t.
Thanks people.

oh, and one more... I thought lacquer finish was supposed to be not real shiny... sort of like satin look; but it seems that some guitars (like gibson lp standards) that are supposed to be lacquer finish are just as shiny as polyurethan finished guitars; is it just buffing/polishing difference or is it like different type of lacquer altogether??

thanks again
Guitars:
* Custom "does-it-all" Strat
*'12 James Tyler Studio Elite HD Burning Water (HSH)
* EVH Wolfgang Special Stealth HT
#12
Quote by thelax
ok... so I guess I just need to be careful and just not treat the guitar like sh*t.
Thanks people.

oh, and one more... I thought lacquer finish was supposed to be not real shiny... sort of like satin look; but it seems that some guitars (like gibson lp standards) that are supposed to be lacquer finish are just as shiny as polyurethan finished guitars; is it just buffing/polishing difference or is it like different type of lacquer altogether??

thanks again



Tradionally, it is a very glossy finish.

The sating and worn, etc... finishes are a differnt kettle of fish.
#13

of course, not mentioning that it's very weak against humidity

Actually this is true. I don't know about "very weak", but it specifically states in my Fender Lacquer Finishes: Precautions & Care pamphlet "Modern polyesters and polyurethanes are harder than lacquer and are much less affected by environmental contitions, heavy use and ageing.
Water which is too pure has no fish - Ts'ai Ken T'an
Last edited by Ratraisin at Jul 22, 2010,