#1
Okay, so I know there are 4 diff types of Triads, Maj. Min. Dimin. and Aug. Triads.

I know the intervals of them and how they are constructed and all that. My only thing I am having trouble understanding is the shapes in different keys.
What i mean is, are the shapes for each type of triad exactly the same even when your in a different key. I was doing it yesterday and I made the traids in the key of B on the low E string, and then I was going to try it in other keys, but I just moved the shapes up to a different key and it sounded the same (Maj. Min. Aug. Dimin.).

Are the triad shapes the same no matter what key your playing in?
#2
I don't really see what your problem is - a major triad will always sound like a major triad. Maybe you can be more specific?
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#3
Are the triad shapes the same no matter what key your playing in?

Yes, but the individual notes in a different key will be a different triad.

Look up chord progressions.
#4
Yeah, they will be the same unless it involves an open string or something like the difference you hit when you get to the high B and E strings.
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#5
They sure are (until you get to the B string anyways). That's one of the great advantages of guitar in my opinion. You're making intervals when you put your fingers down to make a chord. That's why if we make a G major bar chord on the third fret and just move it all up a fret, we have a Ab major bar chord. When we move the shape, the notes all change as well.

For example, if we have an A minor triad (fretted 5, 3, 2 starting on the 6 string) we have the notes A C E. If we move it all up a fret, we have the notes A# C# E# which creates and A# minor triad.

Shapes for intervals pretty much stay the same until you hit the B string or change your tuning, which is why we can know one shape for a type of chord, and move it to the appropriate location. If I know the interval pattern (shape) for a major 7 chord rooted on the A string, I can play ANY major 7 chord on that string. If I play it on the 3rd fret I have Cmaj7, if I play it on the fifth fret I have Dmaj7, if I play it on the 18th fret I have Ebmaj7 etc.

I like to think of the guitar neck as a plane of intervals.
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Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Jul 21, 2010,
#6
1. You should know how to construct triads. A major triad is R-3-5, minor is R-b3-5, etc. It also helps if you know intervals on the fretboard - if root is on 6th string you have a major third on the 5th string one fret down, etc.
2. You should know how to spell triads. For instance, C major is C-E-G. This goes hand in hand with knowing the notes of the fretboard.
3. A good place to start is with triads on various stringsets. So, form triads using the 4th, 5th, and 6th strings in all inversions. Then do the same with the 3rd, 4th, and 5th, etc. If you want, you can also skip strings for open voicings.

You'll find examples of triads on stringsets in this image...
http://www.music-ube-theory.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/15.bmp
#7
Yes, intervals are the same in different keys. A major third is a major third, no matter what.
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#8
Yeah, take the shape of a chord, like an Am for example. If you move it up one fret you got a A#m, another fret and it's a Bm, etc.
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#9
cool thanks guys. I was pretty sure it was all the same, but i was reading a music theory thing on guitar and the guide told to practice making the triads in every key and I figured " if the shapes are all the same for the triads, why should I waste my time doing it on every note? As long as I know what key im in im good."

Oh, and why does the B string change the triad shapes?
#10
Quote by ThrashKing
Oh, and why does the B string change the triad shapes?


Notes past the B string need to be moved up a fret. Just try it yourself. Make a major triad shape on the low E, then move it up a string to the A. Now move it up to the D string. It's no longer a major triad because of the top note. To correct for that we have to move the high note up a fret.

It's because the intervals between the open strings aren't the same.
E to A is a fourth, A to D is a fourth, D to G is a fourth, G to B is a third, and B to E takes it back to a fourth.
(m4, M4, m4, M3, m4 respectively)
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#11
Okay, so I know there are 4 diff types of Triads, Maj. Min. Dimin. and Aug. Triads.


Always wondered this, maybe someone can help, but haven't you missed out sus chords?

Or are they technically not a triad?

I need AeolianWolf or food1010 or someone to the rescue!
Last edited by GilbertsPinky at Jul 22, 2010,
#12
Quote by GilbertsPinky
Always wondered this, maybe someone can help, but haven't you missed out sus chords?

Or are they technically not a triad?
Correct. "Triad" is defined as a three note chord that contains root third and fifth, thus suspended chords don't fit that definition. Some definitions of "trichord" can be used to describe suspended chords (three note chord).

Of course many of these terms have multiple conflicting definitions. Some definitions state that a triad is 1 3 5 while others state that a triad is any set of three notes. Likewise, some definitions state that a trichord is any contiguous set of notes from a scale (such as 1 2 3) while others state that a trichord is any set of three notes.

I generally associate triads with the respective first definition and trichords with the respective second definition, but it all depends on what you're talking about.
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#13
Quote by FacetOfChaos
It's because the intervals between the open strings aren't the same.
E to A is a fourth, A to D is a fourth, D to G is a fourth, G to B is a third, and B to E takes it back to a fourth.
(m4, M4, m4, M3, m4 respectively)


Assuming that m=minor, and M=Major, a correction is needed here. It should read:
P4, P4, P4, M3, P4 - Describing the intervals between the strings. 4th's don't have major or minor connotations.