#1
I'm messing around with a Chord Progression of;
D-A-B-Gminor
With extra notes added in/out of the chords for a bluesy feel
And I cant figure out the key, cause usually the key is the first chord, and D doesn't seem to work if I try to improv over the loop of the progression.
How many guitar players does it take to change a light bulb?

Twelve. One to change the bulb and eleven to say they could do it better.

#3
I think it's A minor? Cause the natural minor scale in A seems to work alright, but I'm not sure either
How many guitar players does it take to change a light bulb?

Twelve. One to change the bulb and eleven to say they could do it better.

#4
I'd say D with a borrowed B chord.
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#5
Quote by Dream Floyd
I'd say D with a borrowed B chord.


D has also no G minor.
#6
You sure that D's not a minor?

It all depends where it wants to resolve to, and to my ears G minor sounds like it wants to end on C minor/D minor.
#7
That's in D major. It's a slight modification of practically the most common chord progression in popular music, I-V-vi-IV.
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#8
Quote by Eastwinn
That's in D major. It's a slight modification of practically the most common chord progression in popular music, I-V-vi-IV.

This. It's in D major but with chord substitutions. D, A, B, Gm is I V VI iv. It has VI and iv substitutions. B major and Gm as opposed to the diatonic Bm and G. When figuring out a progression like this and it's not obvious from a theoretical standpoint, play it and use your ear to see where it resolves most strongly.
When I play that, that Gm sounds like it's dying to go to the D and that resolves it perfectly.

If you want to improvise over this, you'd probably want to adjust what you're playing for the B major and G minor.
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Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Jul 21, 2010,
#9
Quote by NickGiovanni
I'm messing around with a Chord Progression of;
D-A-B-Gminor
With extra notes added in/out of the chords for a bluesy feel
And I cant figure out the key, cause usually the key is the first chord, and D doesn't seem to work if I try to improv over the loop of the progression.


(assuming the D-A-B are Major and the G is minor)........

You have a group of chords, but they are not in a key. No single scale will work over the progression as a whole.

Something like D - A - Bm - G would be a typical D Major progression as Eastwinn suggested, but what you wrote is not an alteration of this. It's either a mistake.... or if you chose those chords based on how they sound ..... its a group of chords that are not in a single key.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 21, 2010,
#10
^ Yeah, there's no one scale that will work over this. In situations like this, play D major over the chords that are diatonic to D major like D and A, and on the non diatonic chords, alter the scale accordingly. For example, the B major has a D#. Play that instead. The G minor has a Bb, say play that instead.

This technique can also be seen in No Rain by Blind Melon. There is a great Guitar Pro tab for it on this site.
i don't know why i feel so dry