#1
Hey guys. So!
I've always been interested in perfect pitch; I've had a number of friends who have synesthesia, and their brain associates sounds (notes) with colors. It seems like a logical enough connection that I felt it might be possible to create that kind of connection, even though I wasn't born with the skill.
So my plan is as follows:
Start off with two or three notes (I chose C, D, and E, for simplicity's sake)
Choose a color to connect with each note ( C was neon green, D was a deep blue, and E was an orange-ish)
Sit down at a midi piano for like half an hour or so, twice a day, and play each note, while looking at a flash card of the corresponding color. To begin, start with one note in one octave with a basic piano sound, but over time, I will add other octaves, and other midi sounds.
After playing each note for a while, leave the keyboard and listen to other music to clear my head, then come back and repeat.
After a few repetitions of this, I'll begin to add other note/color combinations, and begin to rely less on the keyboard.
What do you guys think?
I've got about a month to work on this, before heading off to college, so I'm gonna start on it as soon as possible.
I'll give updates every so often, if you guys are interested
yeah, i've got gear too...
squier strat
squier tele
Ibanez rg4ex
Boss DS-1
Morely Bad Horsie Wah
Digitech Hot Head
Boss GE-7
Zoom G1X
Mesa Boogie 5:50 Express
Vox AD50vt
#2
look around the internet for a perfect pitch course and download it. near the beggining there's an excercise like the one you mention, but i think the course may make it easier. it does work, btw. i didnt do it because im lazy, but a friend did, and it's really surprising.

download utorrent or something and search for 'perfect pitch' in the famous bay for corsairs
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#3
Ehh, What if your brain doesn't want to relate the notes to those colors? You're better off learning how intervals sound like.

You cant train Perfect Pitch anyways, you have to be pretty much born with it. It's not only about notes either, it's about frequencies and recognizing the same frequencies in sounds coming out of a lamp or A/C with the sound of a car or something. And on top of that for music it turns into a bit of a nightmare not being able to hear a chord as a whole sound but as each single note within it. It's definitely a gift but you cant train that.

It's easy to recognize the note out of the same instrument you practice every single day, but what about that same note in an infinite range of timbres? With interval training you dont have to deal with that, plus it lends better to making music since melody is based off of intervals.
#4
Perfect pitch is useless without relative pitch. IMO it's useless in general, but you're getting nothing out of it without being able to recognize intervals in the first place. To hear, recognize, and play thinking intervalically is extremely useful in a musical context, while being able to hear tones of notes is not. To me, it seems to be more of a burden if anything.. if you're playing with guitarists it will drive you insane, for not everyone plays in perfect tune.
#5
I think you are going to be disappointed with the results. It seems like you'd be better off spending time working on relative pitch, unless you feel solid in that area. But I'd be interested to read your updates.
#6
You'd probably want to check with a scientist or someone knowlegeable in the phycology or some science pertaining to the brain/mind before you do this. Seems like a buch of gobbledy-gook to me.

As for perfect pitch: you can't learn it; you're born with it.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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#7
Sounds like an interesting experiment, but I doubt the usefullness. And as for perfect pitch, I think you should probably be able to learn it, you aren't born with it. It's not like there is a gene that decides if you have "Perfect pitch".
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#8
Quote by pinguinpanic
Sounds like an interesting experiment, but I doubt the usefullness. And as for perfect pitch, I think you should probably be able to learn it, you aren't born with it. It's not like there is a gene that decides if you have "Perfect pitch".

It's not unreasonable to believe there is a gene for it. Some may be born without the physical ability to develop perfect pitch - just like some people are colour blind and will not be able to discriminate between colours. But like you I believe that it is a skill that can be developed by most people through training and practice.
Si
#9
Quote by 20Tigers
It's not unreasonable to believe there is a gene for it. Some may be born without the physical ability to develop perfect pitch - just like some people are colour blind and will not be able to discriminate between colours. But like you I believe that it is a skill that can be developed by most people through training and practice.


I do agree that you can definitely train it, especially practicing constantly on an instrument you'll start getting used to the notes, but I think there is definitely something genetic about it.

Not only do these people show it at ridiculous early ages, it also applies to frequencies outside of the 12 notes. It's probably a heightened cognitive awareness to sound and frequencies. It shouldn't make a difference if you were born in another culture with different notes, or in an environment completely devoid of music; you'd still be able to discern and recall certain pitches and frequencies that any sound would make.

So in a way trying to get perfect pitch by training yourself to identifying the twelve notes is only a small fragment of what perfect pitch entails. And like I and others said on my first post, it's pretty useless in most musical situations compared to interval training because quite frankly, you cant do much with it. Being able to identify colors doesn't make you a great painter, but mastering the building blocks, like intervals in music, will take you really far.

To me I think, forcefully training yourself instead of slowly getting used to them as you progress will only turn it into a party trick. And to be honest, If I wanted to increase my musicianship exponentially, theres tons of other things I'd rather fill up my limited brain hard drive with that would be much more helpful and useful.

To each his own though.
#10
There is actually study that strongly suggests that everyone is born with perfect pitch, but if it's not utilised at a young age we lose it. And there are people that know perfect pitch - but how useful is it? Because i can recognise letters of the alphabet doesn't mean i know how to write words or sentences.