#1
I just watched an Interview between Dave Navarro and George Lynch in which George says he couldnt show us a major scale if his life depended on it.

After alot of pissing around with scales etc to improve my soloing I feel confused as to exactly how this guy shreds around the board so easily without even knowing the root notes??? :O

Is there methods other than theorised ones to learn lead guitar? If so could you give a few details?

Thanks alot
#2
Quote by MWriff
I just watched an Interview between Dave Navarro and George Lynch in which George says he couldnt show us a major scale if his life depended on it.

After alot of pissing around with scales etc to improve my soloing I feel confused as to exactly how this guy shreds around the board so easily without even knowing the root notes??? :O

Is there methods other than theorised ones to learn lead guitar? If so could you give a few details?

Thanks alot


Step 1. Cutt off all of your fingers.
Step 2. Cutt off Paul Gilberts fingers, you may need a friend to help you since you don't have fingers.
Step 3. Sow Paul Gilberts fingers onto your little nubs
??????
Step 4. Profit
Last edited by Pithy Radish at Jul 21, 2010,
#4
My bet is that he could... Musicians like to sy stuff like this every once in a while. Its like when Paul McCartney said he couldn't read sheet music but then he composes a piece for an orchestra... okie doke... not buying it.
#5
I learned EVERYTHING by ear, by watching people play and by playing around the fret board.

I didn't really start to learn proper items, such as scales, arpeggios, chord structures, until I was about 23 and was already an confident, creative string player and song writer.

Some fo the best musicians learned with out a single formal lesson. Some of the worst went to grad school for Music Theory.

It's not necessarily that one method is better than the other, but you will deffinitly see different results and techniques based on the structure of the learning method.


*When I jam with super serious theory guys, and they say a complex chord title that I'm not familure with, I still watch them and feel it out until it's right and say "this sounds better"
#6
The most obvious way someone could be a great player without knowing scales is if he has a great ear. He's still using scales, just not thinking about them explicitly saying "I'm using D major...."

But I'm always skeptical when top level guys say they don't know any scales or theory.
#8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOVqQNJUHNQ
I'm assuming that's the video your talking about. He refers to specific intervals, so he does know music theory. And he talks about the blues scale.
He also does know root notes, he refers to an F# in the beginning, and he later plays riffs in different octaves.
He might not know the major scale but he knows other parts of theory.
Last edited by cal1fub3ralle5 at Jul 21, 2010,
#9
Quote by cal1fub3ralle5
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOVqQNJUHNQ
I'm assuming that's the video your talking about. He refers to specific intervals, so he does know music theory. And he talks about the blues scale.
He also does know root notes, he refers to an F# in the beginning, and he later plays riffs in different octaves.
He might not know the major scale but he knows other parts of theory.


cheers man Im one of the retards who will watch something then ask about it afterwards I only retain like 10% of what i see
#10
Quote by mh1986
My bet is that he could... Musicians like to sy stuff like this every once in a while. Its like when Paul McCartney said he couldn't read sheet music but then he composes a piece for an orchestra... okie doke... not buying it.

Yes, it is simply unfeasible that he could learn how to read sheet music after making such a comment.
#11
Quote by RockInPeaceDime
I rarely believe skilled guitarists who say they don't know a lick of theory.

Exactly, they lie to you. maybe not about theory per se, but "I never really practiced", you can pretty much assume it's a lie.
No one is bor with guitar playing skill.