#1
So I just want to record myself playing to see how I progress therefore I don't need a top notch sound quality but I would prefer to get my recordings on my computer. I don't have any experience in this field. What would be the cheapest and easiest way? My budget is about 50-100$.
#2
Well first of all, Don't bother getting recording stuff if you suck. How long you been playing? Get friend and families opinions. No point in wasting money on recording stuff if you sound horrible. If your good (such as being able to play Canon Rock or sweep) then ok, you could get stuff. But all you want recording stuff for is to hear yourself???? You can hear it through an amp surely?
#3
Quote by zakarai
Well first of all, Don't bother getting recording stuff if you suck. How long you been playing? Get friend and families opinions. No point in wasting money on recording stuff if you sound horrible. If your good (such as being able to play Canon Rock or sweep) then ok, you could get stuff. But all you want recording stuff for is to hear yourself???? You can hear it through an amp surely?


I don't think you could have missed the point more.

Try a Zoom H1.
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#4
ololol, somebody should sig that guy.

As far as cheap recording stuff goes, Pod Farm and the GX is great idea, and try Reaper out for a free DAW(Digital Audio Workstation). Do not use audacity, reaper is better in every possible way. Just go to the Cockos(People who made Reaper) website and try it out.
#5
Quote by zakarai
Well first of all, Don't bother getting recording stuff if you suck. How long you been playing? Get friend and families opinions. No point in wasting money on recording stuff if you sound horrible. If your good (such as being able to play Canon Rock or sweep) then ok, you could get stuff. But all you want recording stuff for is to hear yourself???? You can hear it through an amp surely?



Worst. Advice. Ever.

It's always a good idea to record yourself. It's a lot harder to critically evaluate your playing WHILE you're playing; much easier to do so when listening to playback.

When I first started, I had a cheap little 4-track line-in cassette recorder that I used. However, now you can get a much better digital recording device for the same price. If you're willing to go up to $150, you could get a Line6 TonePort. Great for recording on a computer. Comes with recording software and PodFarm modeling software.
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#6
I'm not even going to bother writing a quick-witted reply to Mr. Canon Rock's post because honestly, words just don't describe that ind of stupidity (no offense Mr. Canon Rock). Unfortunately, you're not going to get anything with fantastic tracking speed or sound quality at $50-100. Some of Tascam's lower-end units are relatively inexpensive and are usually quite reliable. I'm not a huge fan of Line 6's USB gear personally, but I admit I've heard some fantastic recordings with the use of them. One company I seriously suggest you avoid is M-Audio. I love their keyboards, I love a lot of their stuff, but their 1X1 interfaces and crap are notorious for being extremely latent regardless of computer speed, unreliable and just all around bad. Once again, I've heard good things about them from a few, but for the most part, it's negative reviews. As far as software, many interfaces come with cheap light versions of Cubase or some sort of Cakewalk-based SONAR-type knock off which can oftentimes actually be quite good.

It's actually an excellent idea to try recording yourself because it can firstly help you improve your rhythmic skills, it'll give you early experience for recording and you may start to pick up some useful skills if you wish to continue with recording. The biggest advantage I find about recording is that you can listen to yourself from the viewpoint of a listener, rather than the player and it actually let's you see yourself in a more objective viewpoint.

Regardless of what you buy, you're not going to make any phenomenal recordings right off the bat anyway. It doesn't matter whether you've got a Neve console, a C|24, an old Tascam unit or even just a 1/4"-USB cable, recording, mixing, producing and mastering all have their own sets of skills that you've gotta practice. So I really do suggest you go along with this man, because the earlier you start, the sooner your ear will begin to hear fine adjustments and you will begin to develop mixing skills that 99.9% of the people on this website lack.
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#7
Quote by zakarai
Well first of all, Don't bother getting recording stuff if you suck. How long you been playing? Get friend and families opinions. No point in wasting money on recording stuff if you sound horrible. If your good (such as being able to play Canon Rock or sweep) then ok, you could get stuff. But all you want recording stuff for is to hear yourself???? You can hear it through an amp surely?

I want to add to everyone elses very good criticisms by saying that Canon Rock isn't THAT hard and sweep isn't either - they're just techniques. Also, I've never seen B.B King shred or sweep in his life, but he is undoubtably and unarguably a guitar god worth recording - the same would go for Jimmy Page and countless others. Also, personally I find recording good fun - regardless of how good you sound, the whole concept is cool and I enjoy doing takes to perfection and then playing them through and feeling satisfied, and other than my family no-ones ever heard my recordings (although soon I will bless youtube with some videos - although youtube may find thats a rather mixed blessing )

So, all in all, your post is rated fail

TS, I'd recommend starting with something similar to PerpetualBurn's reccomendation - a small Line 6 POD or Zoom FX unit won't sound amazing, but its cheap and it'll give you the chance to record for some fun. Later you can move on to systems with an audio interface going into your PC and experiment with micing your amp and stuff