#1
First off, if this isnt the right place to post this, I'm sorry, I couldnt think of anywhere else to post it.

Does anybody know a site I can go to that gives jazz guitar lessons? I've noticed recently that when I pick up my guitar I usually play some powerchord progression or just chug away on the low E string. I'm getting really bored of that, and I noticed somebody playing jazz style last time I went to the local guitar shop. It sounded great and looked like a lot of fun to play, so I'm interested in learning that now.

The only problem is, I dont have a job, so I cant pay for lessons, locally or on the internet. When I googled it all I found were DVDs and stuff like that. If somebody could show me somewhere where I can find free lessons (text or video, it doesnt matter to me) I'd be greatful.

Thanks ^-^
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#3
Thanks, some of the lessons looked nice, but I'm a little more interested in the technical part of it. Like I want to learn what chords and scales and whatnot, this is mostly examples of the style.
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#4
id say pick up a copy of The Advancing Guitarist and How to Play Jazz and improvise (together they will run you about $30). Work through the latter and then start working on easy tunes (from aebersolds maiden voyage) the former will last you most of your career as a guitarist. Listen to a ton of jazz and learn from records (starting with easy heads and solos and progressing to more difficult stuff). As you get more advanced The Jazz Theory Book will become a good investment.
cheaper then a teacher, not as quick but very effective. Also practice everything you would do with a play along or another guitarist only with a metronome. if your lines aren't making the changes without acompaniment, they won't sound better with it, they'l just sound like mediocre lines with accompaniment.
Learn diatonic triads and seventh chords for the Major scale, then melodic and harmonic minor.
#5
Hmm.. I'll search those up on here and see if I can find any lessons. I should be able to get a job once I turn 16, when I do I'll see if I can find those books.

Thanks!
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#8
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Do you listen to jazz? Might be a good idea if you want to play it... (I'm just basing this off the bands listed in your profile)


+1

thats important.
shred is gaudy music
#9
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Do you listen to jazz? Might be a good idea if you want to play it... (I'm just basing this off the bands listed in your profile)

That would make a lot of sense wouldnt it.. Any suggestions on who to listen to?
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#10
Quote by deathbycontrol
That would make a lot of sense wouldnt it.. Any suggestions on who to listen to?


For guitar based jazz:

Wes Montgomery
Joe Pass
Pat Metheny
John Scofield (these last two are fusion, but they fit into a more modern electric context a lot easier than the previous two)
Django Reinhardt

I'd also take a look into modern players who incorporate jazz/fusion ideas into their music such as Guthrie Govan, Greg Howe and maybe Dave Weiner (his newest album has some jazzier ideas, but definitely isn't jazz)

Also take a look at some players of other instruments, such as the obvious types like Miles Davis, Coltrane, Charles Mingus, Dave Brubeck, the list goes on.

I'd also strongly suggest listening to neo-bop Sax player Joshua Redman, mainly just cos I'm a big fan.

But yeah, what I suggest you do, get into Jazz, listen to it a lot, with this, figure out how to play the songs by ear. (or at least parts of songs).
Alongside this, learn theory, just theory in general, building chords, scales, modes, etc etc, then have both worlds meet.

For example, if you learn something liek Yesterdays by Wes Montgomery (very good song BTW ) it's all fine playing it note for note and all that, but if you know the theory you'll be able to improvise to the bassline/chord progression due to knowing the "right" notes and all that. And of course if you delve into the world of jazz and learn as much as you can your knowledge of the phrasing and mannerisms of jazz players will help you get a "jazzy" style to your playing.
#11
I'm gonna throw in a plug for Mike Dodge also, the guy knows his stuff and is an experienced teacher. Ive watched some of his webcasts, and he truly does try and help others. If I were a cat looking to learn jazz and had no one local to learn from I'd go to that guy. You can check out his website at mikedodge.com I believe.

Sean
#12
Alright, I'll check them out, thanks.
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#14
learn a lot of jazz standards (i.e. the real book) - like chord progressions, get a feel for the overall harmony involved

and listen to a LOT of jazz
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


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