#1
Ok, so I've been playing for about 7 years, seriously for the past 2. My rhythm technique is and has always been pretty good, at least to me. But I seriously lack soloing skills. I'm into a variety of music, but majority being prog. metal, metalcore, and melodic death metal. Rhythm is cool for that stuff, but isn't the real fun in soloing? I mean I can't even improvise. It sucks when you're jamming with someone and they're like "play something" and you have no idea of what to do. I know my pentatonic, major/minor, h.minor, and a few 'exotic' scales, but don't know when or where to use them. Are there any exercises or lessons that would benefit me?
#2
try learning others solos pick up licks and stuff from there
but youl get better with practice thouhg
#3
Listen to a lot of music and learn a few licks here and there, so you'll develop a better understanding of where certain scales fit. It's also helpful if you learn how to solo over chord progressions by recognizing what fits over certain chords.
#4
I know my pentatonic, major/minor, h.minor, and a few 'exotic' scales, but don't know when or where to use them.

Then you don't really know/understand those scales, you know the patterns. It's like having dictionary, not speaking english and trying to write a novel. You're lacking the theory to do anything with what you have.
#6
To me and from my teaching experience I break soloing into 2 or 3 parts as I was recently having a conversation with a fellow band that wanted to add solos to their work about this.

1. Lick Library- this is composed of licks from exercises you've learned, cliches, other solos you've learned, and anything of your own you make up from scales or whatever.

2. Scale/fretboard knowledge- this is knowing scales and or scale formulas and placing them in key and or on the fretboard which takes that knowledge to make it all usable and gives you basically your "color pallette" to work with.

3. Groove/feel- this is just keeping things appropriate and feeling the tempo of the song and not going crazy shred on a simple 12 bar jam or country chord progression keeping things that fit the tempo and feel of the song you know.

Lastly you mentioned you know scales but don't know how to use them which refers to parts 1 and 2. knowing what key your jamming in helps you determine what scales to use as well as the lick library to use the scales to put the licks into use using the patterns from the library just transposing into the proper key. hope this helps.
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#8
When I'm having trouble getting improvisation flowing, I listen to some solos by my favorite guitarists. I don't try to do what they do, it just puts me in the mindset of, "Ok, that sounds awesome, maybe if I take this EVH lick and combine it with this Malmsteen cluster****..." and occaisionally what comes out is a decent-sounding improvised solo. But that's just me.
#9
Quote by Noslo13
When I'm having trouble getting improvisation flowing, I listen to some solos by my favorite guitarists. I don't try to do what they do, it just puts me in the mindset of, "Ok, that sounds awesome, maybe if I take this EVH lick and combine it with this Malmsteen cluster****..." and occaisionally what comes out is a decent-sounding improvised solo. But that's just me.


That's everyone, I think!

The bolded part is the important part. If you're improvising, you can't expect everything to come out amazing first time. It's like expecting everything you say to come out as poetry or something.

Sometimes you can write beautiful poetry, sometimes you can just end up talking shit...but you can't be afraid of talking shit when you're just making it up!