#1
Every time I see something related to playing and improvising solos on here, people talk about playing the chord tones. I think this is something I need to try and do, since I've hit a rut at the moment with my improvisation and I always just end up running up and down scale shapes. In other words, my phrasing sucks.

So, how do I do this? How do you hear the rhythm chord, figure out the notes in it and figure out where the notes are on the fretboard so quickly? I can't seem to do it!

Thanks.
#2
You just need to learn the notes on the fretboard fairly well, and until you develop a really good ear it helps to know the chord progession that you are playing over. So for example over an A major you should try and end your phrase on either an A a C# or an E. The other notes can be used as passing notes although some will still harmonise if you land on them. Search up Marty Friedman's melodic control on youtube, obviously he explains it much better than I can.
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Last edited by turtlewax at Jul 22, 2010,
#3
Lots of practice. It took me about five years (after I was already good at playing other styles of music) to even begin to improvise over jazz changes.

The biggest jump in improvement for me was after I got a jazz teacher, who really drilled structure into my practice sessions.

The best way to start is with ii-V-I changes. It is probably the most common rhythm pattern you will hear in jazz. Practice improvising over ii-V-I in all keys until your fingers bleed. Then practice some more. Soon, you should have the sound of ii-V-I ingrained in your brain, and you can move on to other patterns.

Also note that listening to lots of jazz with a keen ear helps. Find a small set of popular standards that you want to play. Listen to them over and over again. Listen to versions by different artists. Find the changes to them, learn the heads and the changes, and practice jamming over them every day.

Hope this helps.
#4
Quote by greenplayerman
Lots of practice. It took me about five years (after I was already good at playing other styles of music) to even begin to improvise over jazz changes.

The biggest jump in improvement for me was after I got a jazz teacher, who really drilled structure into my practice sessions.

The best way to start is with ii-V-I changes. It is probably the most common rhythm pattern you will hear in jazz. Practice improvising over ii-V-I in all keys until your fingers bleed. Then practice some more. Soon, you should have the sound of ii-V-I ingrained in your brain, and you can move on to other patterns.

Also note that listening to lots of jazz with a keen ear helps. Find a small set of popular standards that you want to play. Listen to them over and over again. Listen to versions by different artists. Find the changes to them, learn the heads and the changes, and practice jamming over them every day.

Hope this helps.

Thanks. I don't really play jazz, but I'm sure that'll apply to other genres too. So thanks


Quote by turtlewax
Search up Marty Friedman's melodic control on youtube, obviously he explains it much better than I can.
Thanks for the suggestion, I shall check it out