#1
I've made the decision to not use tabs anymore, as it seems like a little bit of a cheat to me.
I've got a lot of sheet music for the kind of things I want to learn, but should I solely use this music, or would it be benificial to try and learn them by ear, or both?
Quote by strat0blaster
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#2
Definitely both. I made the mistake of never practicing sight-reading, so I'm an absolutely terrible sight reader. However, I've learned many, many songs by ear, so I like to think I've got a pretty good ear. Nevertheless, I think both are crucial skills to have in order to progress as a guitarist and more importantly, a musician.
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#3
I assumed that would be the answer

Hypothetical situation - If there is a song that I can't seem to transcribe, should I default to learning it through sight reading, or leave it and then try another song, or try transcribing the same song the next day?
Quote by strat0blaster
HA!

Well played, my friend.

I'm going to edit that awful grammar right now


Yay, I'm sigged!!
And a grammar nazi..
#4
When practising sight reading you would, ideally, use pieces that you've never heard so that you are forced to read the music instead of just using your ear and your memory. So when you're learning to sight read try and use songs/pieces you've never heard.

If you hypothetical situation is taking place after you have learned to sight read well then it's really your choice. If you have the sheet music then it's really a matter of convinience, as it would probably be quicker to sight read it.

However, bear in mind that in this situation it would most likely improve your transcribing to transcribe the song more than it would improve your sight reading to sight read it. This is because, as I stated above, once you have heard the song you will be using a combination of the sheet music and your memory. This will usually lead to you using the music for the pitches but using your memory for the rhythm which is detrimental if you want to improve your sight reading because the rhythm is actually the hardest part of sight reading.
#5
I can't believe I hadn't even considered the idea of trying to sight read music I don't know!!
I'll definitely start doing that, as it will be the most beneficial way to improve sight reading.

Thanks a lot, I'll make sure to practice both
Quote by strat0blaster
HA!

Well played, my friend.

I'm going to edit that awful grammar right now


Yay, I'm sigged!!
And a grammar nazi..
#6
Quote by 12345abcd3
the rhythm is actually the hardest part of sight reading.


I disagree. In my personal experience rhythm is the easiest part of sight reading, as it is the only part of the standard notation that is finite, when reading for guitar.

The main problem I had when making the switch from tablature to standard notation was that I was still thinking about the licks I was playing as numbers on the fret board, as opposed to notes on the fret board. As 12345abcd3 said, the easiest way around this is to learn pieces you don't already know, as there will be no reference in your head concerning numbers on the fret board. It will also force you to try new, or previously underused, fingerings, which is always a good thing.
#7
Quote by KennghisTron
I disagree. In my personal experience rhythm is the easiest part of sight reading, as it is the only part of the standard notation that is finite, when reading for guitar.
The pitch is finite too. Learning how to finger passages quickly comes with time.

Simple rhythms are fine but, in my experience, rhythms can get very complicated, much more complicated than pitch ever gets. Admittedly, the rhythms I've encoutered playing classical music are probably more complicated that those played by the average guitarist.

Quote by sTarbuck
I can't believe I hadn't even considered the idea of trying to sight read music I don't know!!
I'll definitely start doing that, as it will be the most beneficial way to improve sight reading.

Thanks a lot, I'll make sure to practice both
I suggest getting a simple classical guitar book simply because books of easy classical pieces are usually easier to come by that easy rock guitar songs. Also, you're probably less likely to know the pieces.
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Jul 23, 2010,
#8
A good ear is important. Learning to sightread is important. But I don't think that the occasional tab is cheating. Tabs have been used for hundreds of years. In various eras it has been the favourable way of notating alot of stringed instruments.
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#9
transcribe it INTO sheet music and then compare it with the actual sheet music you have.
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#10
I just want to add one thing. Don't think of tablature as cheating; it really isn't. It's just a specific type of notation for the guitar.
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#11
Quote by 12345abcd3
The pitch is finite too. Learning how to finger passages quickly comes with time.


Come on dude, you knew I was talking about fingering.

Either way I stand by my opinion. Whether playing classical or anything else I find the rhythm to be the easiest part, and the first bit I pick up
#12
I know a lot of people don't like bad things to be said about tabs but the bottom line is they are not musical in any way - they just tell you where to put your fingers. And they offer nothing in improving as a musician.

I transcribe songs I know by ear and practice sight reading by just downloading a random pdf. Both these factors are part of my practice. It is very frustrating when you hit a brick wall when transcribing but I find it helps (as you mentioned) to leave it til the next day and try again - it's better to take a fresh approach another day than sit there and get pissed off at it.
#13
How about this: Whatever you can find sheet music for, use that. Whatever you can't, use your ear.

Sounds good to me. I'd never be able to do it (no patieeenccceee) but you might want to give it a shot.
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#14
Not to advertise or anything, but for sight reading, subscribing to jamplay for a month and downloading the music reading lessons would give you plenty of content to practice with, and if I recall correctly they allow you to do so.

Just remember to return to UG straight after and pray to zappp for forgiveness and cleanse your tainted soul!

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Last edited by osXtiger at Aug 4, 2010,
#15
Quote by youngangus69
I know a lot of people don't like bad things to be said about tabs but the bottom line is they are not musical in any way - they just tell you where to put your fingers. And they offer nothing in improving as a musician.
Maybe not as a musician, but possibly as a guitarist. A guitar tab communicates more than just pitches in that it also tells you where to play them. Tab readers can then get a sense for proper fingerings for riffs/scales, and what kinds of riffs should be played farther up or down on the neck, since the same note sounds a lot different on each string.

As for the OP, I'd say that if you were stuck on a song for a pretty solid amount of time, I would at least begin to look at a tab/sheet music. You probably wouldn't get much farther if you kept trying, nor would you learn much if you moved on to something else, so you might as well see what the deal was. I think of it like studying for a test: Don't kill yourself over a study question you can't get, and don't just look up the answer if you don't know right away. Spend some solid time on it, and if you really get stuck, then check the answer .