#1
Basically, what are they? Can you get them on an electric guitar too? I've seen few videos online with a single coil that is said to be one of these, but I cant find any on Ebay. They sound so beautiful.

Sorry if this is the wrong forum.


Quote by a_hub10
I keep my Schecter in dropped D all the time, and i didn't buy an attachment of any kind.

Quote by CraftyTrickster
You should just tell the seller: ¡Boludo!
#2
Yes, you can put them into electrics too, John Petrucci for one uses Piezo a lot (just listen to that "acoustic" tone, mmmm)

Some sound demo:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1D9jFxZTF4
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#3
Quote by Lewadra
Yes, you can put them into electrics too, John Petrucci for one uses Piezo a lot (just listen to that "acoustic" tone, mmmm)

Some sound demo:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1D9jFxZTF4


Are they active all the time or do they work as single coils until you activate them with a switch?

And also which brands make them? I couldnt find any on the SD site


Quote by a_hub10
I keep my Schecter in dropped D all the time, and i didn't buy an attachment of any kind.

Quote by CraftyTrickster
You should just tell the seller: ¡Boludo!
#4
Quote by haceteunosmates
Are they active all the time or do they work as single coils until you activate them with a switch?

All both magnetic and piezoelectric pickups create a current whenever the strings are moving, even if you aren't plugged in to anything. The switches control when, how, and how much of that current reaches the amplifier. "Active" pickups just use an external power source (like a battery) to pre-amplify the signal before it gets to the amp.

Piezoelectric and magnetic materials produce currents using totally different mechanisms. To put it really simply, if you physically squeeze a piezo pickup, it creates a current. If you squeeze it at a frequency, it creates a changing current that can be amplified into useful sound. Magnetic pickups generate an oscillating current as a metal moves back and forth through their magnetic field.

Piezo pickups can go on any guitar because they don't rely on metal strings - just motion. They have electric guitars with both types, sometimes on the same instrument. Calling a piezoelectric pickup "single coil" doesn't really make sense, because there isn't any coil in the device.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Jul 22, 2010,
#5
Quote by GC Shred Off
All both magnetic and piezoelectric pickups create a current whenever the strings are moving, even if you aren't plugged in to anything. The switches control when, how, and how much of that current reaches the amplifier. "Active" pickups just use an external power source (like a battery) to pre-amplify the signal before it gets to the amp.

Piezoelectric and magnetic materials produce currents using totally different mechanisms. To put it really simply, if you physically squeeze a piezo pickup, it creates a current. If you squeeze it at a frequency, it creates a changing current that can be amplified into useful sound. Magnetic pickups generate an oscillating current as a metal moves back and forth through their magnetic field.

Piezo pickups can go on any guitar because they don't rely on metal strings - just motion. They have electric guitars with both types, sometimes on the same instrument. Calling a piezoelectric pickup "single coil" doesn't really make sense, because there isn't any coil in the device.


Oh yes I just read more about them and found out they are put underneath the bridge.

The only brand I found that makes them is Fishman but you have to buy the whole bridge. Are they reliable/stay in tune just as well? They are pretty damn expensive..


Quote by a_hub10
I keep my Schecter in dropped D all the time, and i didn't buy an attachment of any kind.

Quote by CraftyTrickster
You should just tell the seller: ¡Boludo!
#6
My Parker has them built into the bridge, as does my Godin, and they sound great through a Fishman Aura and an acoustic amp.

It's not as easy as just swapping the bridge, as you also need to find room for the preamp/battery and a spot on the front of your guitar for a pot and switch to activate the signal out from that pickup to whatever you're plugged into. You're probably further ahead to search for a guitar that has the system built in already, unless you have a competent luthier in your area and are willing to pay.
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#7
Quote by haceteunosmates
Oh yes I just read more about them and found out they are put underneath the bridge.

The only brand I found that makes them is Fishman but you have to buy the whole bridge. Are they reliable/stay in tune just as well? They are pretty damn expensive..

Actually they don't need to be, but generally are. I do know that soundboard transducers exist, but I'm not sure where to find them.

Under-saddle piezos are quite reliable and don't affect tuning stability at all.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Jul 23, 2010,