#1
hi i live in karachi pakistan which is a coastal city like miami and it gets very humid here. the humidity results in a alot of rust on my strings which not only make it look dirty but makes the strings lose their crispyness earlier than expected. it there any way i can stop that fom happening?
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#2
Maybe you should clean them after every session.Or try some Elixir Anti-Rust Acoustic Guitar strings-don't know how they sound though.
#4
Yeah clean the fretboard and strings after every use, or get a guitar storage cabinet with a humidifier.
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#5
i use elixirs, no issues at all... and the coating helps them last longer....
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#6
Try coated strings (can be debated the tone isn't as great as uncoated, but that's subjective), clean them before and after every use, keep it in it's case whenever it's not being used, put a dehumidifier in the room where it's most played (check the humidity first, if it's always high, then a dehumidifier).
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#7
using coated strings like elixers will end your problem with rust. the issue you should really be concerned with is that your guitar is being exposed to too much humidity. if it swells, not only will it sound worse, but it can swell enough to have the bracing pull away from the inside of the guitar. of course, that's not true if you're playing a carbon fiber guitar like a composite acoustic, an emerald or a rainsong.
#8
You might try a trick recommended by Howard Roberts (jazz player)once in Guitar Player magazine... spraying down your strings with WD-40. (if that's available where you live)

He placed newspapers under the strings (on the guitar) to protect the instrument and then lightly sprayed the strings, wiping off any excess after a minute.
WD-40 has a "carrier" that evaporates to leave a light protective film behind. Prevents rust and corrosion fairly well.
#9
Quote by patticake
if it swells, not only will it sound worse, but it can swell enough to have the bracing pull away from the inside of the guitar.


what is the bracing?
i had this one repaired because the tail on which the bridge lies could'nt take the tension and started coming out. is this something to do with the brace? i'll post some pics in just a minute.
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#10



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#11
unless i'm mistaken, this is your bridge lifting. that's a common issue with guitars that are exposed to too much humidity. if you don't do something about the humidity your guitar is exposed to, this will keep happening.

the bracing is inside your guitar. it is what holds the guitar together and also is what creates the tone specific to the guitar. if a piece comes loose, you may have rattling inside the guitar. the guitar can come apart, and the tone will have issues.

if you keep your guitar in a case or gigbag, you can buy gel packs to lower the humidity. honestly the first thing you should do is buy a hygrometer. there are some pretty cheap ones out there. next is to do a salt test on the hygrometer, and then use it so you always know the humidity your guitar is at.
#12
can you please outline some steps to help with the humidity? i'll get the gel packs but is there anything else for the strings? and could this also be the fault of cheap manufacture cuz the guitar is real cheap. i got it for less than $50 (4000 rupees to be exact). so i thought maybe it was because it's low quality? because i will be soon getting a Yamaha and i don't want this to happen to that too.
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#13
this is not because your guitar is cheap. if anything, more expensive guitars are more sensitive to humidity issues.

the first thing to do is get a hygrometer, do a salt test so you know how far off it is - hygrometers are always a bit off - and then keep track of the humidity where your guitar lives. assuming it's high, you might want to try planetwaves humidipak, as they're the easiest to find, but i've heard better things about zorb-it. i hear they're cheaper, more consistent and last longer. guitar players i know really like them. if you have air conditioning, running it will lower the humidity, but you won't know how much it lowers it without a hygrometer. you could get a room de-humidifier.

last, if you can keep your guitar in a closet, you might want to try eva-dry. i haven't tried these myself but have heard good things.
#14
A friend of mine spent a year in Hawaii a while back. He seemed to think there was airborne salt from the ocean water that quickly corroded his strings. I've never even seen an ocean myself, so I can't confirm this. Perhaps this is consistant with living on the coast?
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#15
how much should the humidity be at in the room or around my guitar?
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#16
I just copy pasted it from a site i saw today:


How does relative humidity affect guitars?
Wood will try to equalize to it's surrounding air, in temperature and humidity. If wood becomes too moist it will swell; on the other hand, if wood gives up it's moisture, it will shrink. All are physical characteristics of wood.


What is the desired level of humidity?
45%-55% relative humidity is optimum. If this is obtained, you minimize the risk of damage. This is the relative humidity the Martin Guitar factory maintains.


What if my guitar has been subject to excessive humidity?
If your guitar has been exposed to excessive humidity seams may separate, bridges may become loose and your action may become unplayable. A dehumidifier is recommended if your guitar has seen these changes.


What if my guitar has been stored in a dry environment?
Low humidity seems to be more of an issue. As your guitar dries, the wood actually shrinks. This results in the top lowering and the strings come with it. All of this stress results in the wood cracking. To solve this problem you should invest in a humidifier. Be sure to also get a hygrometer to measure how much humidity you bring into the air.


What happens to my guitar at 60% humidity?
At 60% relative humidity or above symptoms may include tarnished frets and strings, corrosion to nickel, chrome or gold plating on tuning machines, swelling of the top, high action and loose braces and bridges.


What happens to my guitar at 50% humidity?
At 50% relative humidity your guitar is in good condition.


What happens to my guitar at 40% humidity?
At 40% relative humidity you may see sharp fret ends. This is the area of the fingerboard that extends over the body that may begin to crack slightly from the 12th or 14th fret toward the soundhole.


What happens to my guitar at 35% humidity?
At 35% relative humidity your top will begin to shrink. The soundboard may look and feel rippled or dried in. The sharp fret ends seen in 40% relative humidity will become more evident.


What happens to my guitar at 30% humidity?
At 30% relative humidity you may see cracks in your guitar. Even if you do not see a crack in the guitar, it has still lost moisture and the top has begun to sink. To make your guitar playable you may need a higher saddle.


What happens to my guitar at 25% humidity?
At 25% relative humidity more cracks are seen. Fret filing may be needed.