#2
its possible to do
but whether its a good idea or not i dont know seeing as your asking you have little experience with such things
#3
possible = yes
wise move = heck no

Epi Les Paul Std w/Duncans
ESP LTD EX260
Cry Baby From Hell
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EHX Metal Muff
MXR EVH Phase 90
Carl Martin Classic Chorus
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Crate V50112
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PEDALBOARD JUNKIES
#4
possible, yes. time consuming, yes. could possibly ruin your guitar, yes.
my gear:

Schecter Hellraiser Sunset FR
Line 6 spider 2: 212 combo 120 watt =\
Line 6 guitar port
EVH frankenstein painted Explorer
#5
Why? Schecter necks are some of the most comfortable ones I've ever played. To answer your question, yes, but you would have to sand through the sealer, and sand evenly, then seal it back up. Did that to an Ibanez Gio neck, messed up the binding on the side. If you are very very careful, and know what your doing, then yes you could sand the neck to a flatter radius. Just remember that Jackson's necks are compound radiused, thats why they feel so flat.
#7
Certainly doable if you are particularly attached to the Schecter's other features, but consider that having such a time consuming and perfectionist task done professionally will cost you quite a large sum, to the point that you could consider selling the Schecter and buying a Jackson, trading up to one, or just buying a Jackson alongside it if you like both. I would recommend any of those three as opposed to having such a modification done, as it will also likely hurt your resale value (many people like the Schecter necks how they are).
#8
id do it just to take that shittly slow lacquer finish of of it, ive owned 3 schecters and got rid of all 3 because of the slow necks on them.

unfinished(or oil finished) necks are the only way to go if you ask me.
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Fender standard Tele
Ibanez Rga121
Taylor GA 214E
#9
If its less or around $100 bucks (which is usually the price of buying a new/used neck) then I don't see a major issue. I agree though that you should just use that money for a new jackson.
#10
Yes...anything is possile if you have the money, time, and most importantly....patience.
Gear
Jackson RR24M - EMG ALX w/ ABQ installed
Ibanez Xiphos - stock
LTD Alexi 600 - stock
Ibanex RG - Tone Zone(bridge), PAF Pro(neck)
Blackstar HT-20H
Fulltone OCD
MXR 10 Band EQ
#11
You'd more like have to cut a chunk of the neck out... sanding it down that far would take forever.

Also, I think Jackson necks are wider than Schecter's.
#12
I think the OP just mean sanding it thinner from the back so it isn't as thick. Which is possible, but more work than its really worth.

If he is talking about trying to compound radius the FB, then I would say HELL NO!
Gear
Jackson RR24M - EMG ALX w/ ABQ installed
Ibanez Xiphos - stock
LTD Alexi 600 - stock
Ibanex RG - Tone Zone(bridge), PAF Pro(neck)
Blackstar HT-20H
Fulltone OCD
MXR 10 Band EQ
#13
It would make a lot more sense to just get an ESP that has a comparable body/electronics and a thinner neck (ESP and Schecter have the same parent company, so there are some similar design elements). Or for a really think neck you can just buy a Daisy Rock; they’re Schecter guitars with thin necks (and some sweeeet paint jobs) marketed to teen girls with small hands.
#14
Does your schecter have a bolt-on neck? If so, it might be a better idea to just replace the neck with a custom Warmoth neck if you really don't like it.
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#15
Quote by TMF128
Does your schecter have a bolt-on neck? If so, it might be a better idea to just replace the neck with a custom Warmoth neck if you really don't like it.


That is a great idea!!
Gear
Jackson RR24M - EMG ALX w/ ABQ installed
Ibanez Xiphos - stock
LTD Alexi 600 - stock
Ibanex RG - Tone Zone(bridge), PAF Pro(neck)
Blackstar HT-20H
Fulltone OCD
MXR 10 Band EQ
#16
Get the Warmoth neck that is compound radiused, get a guitar Luther to align the neck bolts, and there you go