#1
Is there any reason some engineers record with their vintage styled condenser mics "upside down?" By upside down I mean the grill that surrounds the diaphragm is facing towards the floor and the mic is pointing towards the ceiling as opposed to being angled towards the floor.

I ran a series of tests and couldn't tell any real difference. My test was weak however since I only have one condenser in that style so I had to record the tracks separately and the differences I heard were probably more in the placement than the angle of the mic.

I just youtubed "recording vocals" hoping I would get what I was looking for,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgdbE1mvhDE

At :018 seconds is what I mean.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

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#2
How would the mic get in the way? It's the exact same placement except for the fact that the cord is hanging down instead of facing the ceiling.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#3
In regards to upside down vs right-side up, it doesn't change the way the mic responds or the dynamics or anything. Guaranteed it has a lot more to do with placement of mic for the best sound, and also for the comfort of the musician.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#4
Quote by Brendan.Clace
In regards to upside down vs right-side up, it doesn't change the way the mic responds or the dynamics or anything. Guaranteed it has a lot more to do with placement of mic for the best sound, and also for the comfort of the musician.



I was wondering if the polar pattern would come across on the recording slightly differently depending. Or if the mic would be more partial to reflections off of the ceiling or the floor depending on the orientation. The sheer placement definitely has the greatest effect on the sound but I was wondering what the orientation did.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#5
Quote by Artemis Entreri
I was wondering if the polar pattern would come across on the recording slightly differently depending. Or if the mic would be more partial to reflections off of the ceiling or the floor depending on the orientation. The sheer placement definitely has the greatest effect on the sound but I was wondering what the orientation did.


Well what you are talking about with polarization and reflections has everything to do with mic placement. it's not that one is better than the other, but rather that it fits every situation and room differently.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#6
from what i know, they did that to keep the radiating heat from tube mics away from the capsule as much as they could to keep the sound from distorting. it just became tradition, i guess
#7
Quote by HomeRecording
from what i know, they did that to keep the radiating heat from tube mics away from the capsule as much as they could to keep the sound from distorting. it just became tradition, i guess


haha yeah, its funny how things like this can make some people think that just cause guy A did it this way, means that if I do it the same way, it will sound just as good lol.

Studio "secrets" if you will
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#8
as was already said, it has to do with heat going directly up in the capsule. you generally want very very consistent recordings, and the capsule heating up would cause it to change how it picks up the sound.

another reason that matters more today (although tube mics are still used a lot) is that, for singers, you can get it more out of the way. if you have a very animated singer, it's best to give them as much room in front of them as possible so you move the stand further away and hang the mic so that it is out of the way.
#10
I'll answer this with a question...

Why do gangstas hold their shooters sideways?

...

...

Just looks cooler. Us sound guys need something to entertain us (and confuse the musicians )
Quote by bjoern_swe
my mom found me sitting in the kitchen, eating Corn Flakes from the floor. when she asked me what I was doing, I just roared at her and ran up to my room.


George Foreman Grill Appreciation Society
#11
Another reason is this...

A common technique in reducing sibilance is to sing slightly over the mic. This is not exactly intuitive for singers, who will either sing right at the mic, or if anything, just at the base of the mic. Solution: place the mic upside-down!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.