#1
I know my hearing in the bass range isn't too good (strange considering I play bass!) but I've noticed recently that I'm beginning to have issues with treble range too.

Take tuning. I could do this in under 30s by ear a few weeks ago, without an amp or with one. Now I can't tune my top two strings (B and E) without a tuner or piano reference.


I've also noticed that I struggle to differentiate between chords using these two strings. For example:

E---1
B---3
G---2

and

E---2
B---3
G---2

The audiologist can't find anything wrong so it's pointless going to see him again. But I'm getting annoyed and frustrated because it's also happening with piano and also my violin.

Anyone got any suggestions? My guitar has been checked by two different people and there's nothing obviously wrong with the set-up.
#2
So you're saying you have a hard time distinguishing between that voicing of D major and D minor, or are you saying that you have a hard time hearing the third at all? If it's the former, then that's nothing abnormal, you just need more relative pitch training.

I've never heard of aural damage concentrated in specific pitch ranges. Naturally, you're going to lose the upper range of your hearing after so much damage, but it shouldn't be concentrated in a specific range.

Also, how do you tune your strings? Maybe you just need to try a different method.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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#3
Quote by food1010
So you're saying you have a hard time distinguishing between that voicing of D major and D minor, or are you saying that you have a hard time hearing the third at all? If it's the former, then that's nothing abnormal, you just need more relative pitch training.

I've never heard of aural damage concentrated in specific pitch ranges. Naturally, you're going to lose the upper range of your hearing after so much damage, but it shouldn't be concentrated in a specific range.

Also, how do you tune your strings? Maybe you just need to try a different method.



I used to be able to ear play perfectly fine. Now anything that uses the top B and E strings just sounds like a muddy mess, and it's also beginning to happen on the other strings too. I also have had to stop playing violin in band because that relies on playing by ear and I just can't do it.


I have two guitars, one tuned in Standard and one tuned to New Standard (CGDAEG from low to high).
#4
Maybe you've just become more aware of pitch.

Same goes for people who think they have good technique but when they slow it down to a metronome they say they have gotten worse, they haven't, they are just more aware of their technique (in your case your hearing capablities).
#5
That sounds about right.

If it's any encouragement, even though people tend to have trouble with certain pitch groups (especially later in life) - generally internal relative pitch stays the same, and with concentration your ears can be brought back in line with "real" pitch until you hear things correctly again.
#6
try sight singing, Auralia Ear Training, and just straight up holding notes for 15-25 seconds..

Im taking all 12 notes and beating them in my head with a hammer.. its starting to work.. When I focus I can guess notes and i usually score around 70% on intervals m2-P15
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#7
Quote by Fassa Albrecht
I used to be able to ear play perfectly fine. Now anything that uses the top B and E strings just sounds like a muddy mess, and it's also beginning to happen on the other strings too. I also have had to stop playing violin in band because that relies on playing by ear and I just can't do it.


I have two guitars, one tuned in Standard and one tuned to New Standard (CGDAEG from low to high).


Maybe you're just psyching yourself out.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 22, 2010,
#8
Well... barring that you really like to blast music when you play and listen to it, I agree with what was said above.

A really good ear training course you can get would be "Fretboard Mastery" by Troy Stetina... combines learning the guitar-specific theory with ear training. I haven't dug into it yet, but I've skimmed it and it's pretty thorough.
#9
have you looked into the fact that it could be a neurological problem?
or it could also be the suggestion that your ears have gotten better, and your noticing how inacurate they were before.
#10
You've been tested by an audiologist, and they've found nothing wrong. You'll just have to realise that you need to train your ear more, not blame it on some random biological problem. Many beginners have trouble telling the difference between minor and major chords, or separating the guitar from the mix in a song. It just takes time.

And I second tehRealcaptain in saying that your ears probably are just getting better - you're hearing yourself for a change.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
this has prolly been said before me but if the audiologist says nothing is wrong and nothing is wrong with your guitar/piano/bass/violin its likely you are more aware of pitch if not that train your ear (i know train has been said srry) to distinguish the diffrent settings
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#12
I went through a period like this.... lasted a couple weeks or so. I couldn't tune my guitar to any level I was happy with, etc. Nothing sounded right.

Dunno what it was, but it went away.

Maybe I was sick or something...

CT
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#14
I know that I used to always tune my guitar by ear, but I have to have a tuner now. I believe I can actually hear pitches better than I used to, and don't like playing if the guitar isn't 100% perfectly in tune, and I have a hard time doing it by ear.

As Griff said, maybe you're just becoming more aware of pitch
#15
Quote by AlanHB
You've been tested by an audiologist, and they've found nothing wrong. You'll just have to realise that you need to train your ear more, not blame it on some random biological problem. Many beginners have trouble telling the difference between minor and major chords, or separating the guitar from the mix in a song. It just takes time.

And I second tehRealcaptain in saying that your ears probably are just getting better - you're hearing yourself for a change.



To be fair, I last saw the audiologist almost 8 months ago and the testing they did was for volume, not pitch. I still can't hear bass sound below or above a certain volume.

I have always been able seperate different instruments in a mix absolutely fine. I can even do this for instruments many people struggle to differentiate, such as different brass instruments, and seperate different instruments in a big band.

And I'm not a beginner either- I've been playing guitar for close to 3.5 years and bass for 4.5 years.
#16
see a neurologist if its that big of an issue. Also if you've been using drugs or drinking, that may temporarily effect your aural perception (I know its harder for me to do things by ear if im hungover or have been smoking too much weed in the last few days), as could being sick.