#1
Hey guys I just recently bought a fender frontman 15g as a back up/ travel amp. It's brand new and only cost me $20 the two issues were that it was missing the speaker and also "didn't work" I was able to get it working quickly by finding the wire that wasnt properly plugged in and now it works great but i need a speaker for it that will maximize the quality but at the same time it's only a fender frontman so it'd make no sense to put in a speaker that I cant get it's full quality out of if there is a cheaper one that will sound just as good. I know very little about guitar speakers I just want one that will sound good and make sense to go in this amp(cost wise) Also If anyone knows any cheap and/or easy performance upgrades I'd love to hear them.
#2
Get on craigslist and scour your local listings for old cabinets that people are selling. These are great buys, expecially for what you're trying to do. Mostly because these speakers are used and broken in nicely AND you can get them cheap usually.

So try that first.
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#3
Try the 8" Weber Signature speakers. They're $24 ceramic or $35 AlNiCo. Shipping might cost half as much as the speaker, but that's about as cheap as you're gonna find a decent speaker.
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#5
You'll want an 8ohm speaker that can handle the power of your amp. If your amp is 50w, then go with 100w~(it's always better to be sure). You don't wanna hook up a 50w speaker to a 50w amp.

As for brands and dimensions, it depends on your budget and what you want out of it.

EDIT: Btw there's no difference between a "guitar" speaker and a regular speaker. You could hook up just any speaker(with the correct impedance and power) and it would work.

As long as you get a good speaker, either it's labeled "guitar speaker" or not, it will do the job.
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Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Jul 23, 2010,
#6
Quote by Spike6sic6

EDIT: Btw there's no difference between a "guitar" speaker and a regular speaker. You could hook up just any speaker(with the correct impedance and power) and it would work.

As long as you get a good speaker, either it's labeled "guitar speaker" or not, it will do the job.

So wrong
#7
Quote by kurtlives91
So wrong


What is wrong? I can assure you any speaker will work. It's not like I haven't tested it before, either.

Thought I'd add, I have repaired guitar amps before, and I have tried them with different kinds of speakers, ranging from JBL ones, to Kenwood, etc and I can assure you most speakers of the same size will do the job.

What matters is the frequency response of the speaker. A bigger speaker will let out more bass, and vice versa.

There's no such thing as a "guitar" speaker. There are speakers that are "optimised" for guitars, as in they have the good frequency response for guitar. But that doesn't mean "regular" speakers won't work. Most speakers of the same size will do the job. It's up to you to believe me or not.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Jul 23, 2010,
#8
Come on man, don't twist your words.

Optimized for guitar is a guitar speaker. Like you said it's all about the frequency response of a speaker. Compare the frequency response of a speaker you'd put into a guitar cab vs a speaker you'd throw into your home stereo. Your in a whole other world of pain there.

P.S. I don't have to believe you. I have tested all this myself

O P.P.S there are many classic amps that run their speakers to the break of their power rating. The AC30 comes to mind, it's output almost or exceeds the power of the speakers. Sounds amazing that way, it's all part of the tone. So that double the power rule kinda just flew out the window.

Smaller power amps also have a harder time pushing those big magnet speakers. I have lots of experience with that. The amp sounds kinda constipated trying to get the air moving.
Last edited by kurtlives91 at Jul 23, 2010,
#9
Quote by kurtlives91
Come on man, don't twist your words.

Optimized for guitar is a guitar speaker. Like you said it's all about the frequency response of a speaker. Compare the frequency response of a speaker you'd put into a guitar cab vs a speaker you'd throw into your home stereo. Your in a whole other world of pain there.

P.S. I don't have to believe you. I have tested all this myself


Taken from Wiki;

"A guitar speaker is a loudspeaker – specifically the driver (transducer) part – designed for use in or with the guitar amplifier of an electric guitar. Typically these drivers produce only the frequency range relevant to guitars which is similar to a regular woofer type driver which is approximately 75 Hz — 5 kHz."

Therefore, any speaker that can deliver 75Hz to 5kHz will work just as good. Quality is another story. You can get very good quality JBL speakers, etc.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#10
O shit, your breaking out Wiki....that's a reliable source and a half.....I'm backed into a corner now

Read the words PRODUCE and SIMILAR.....like I stated earlier guitar speakers are voiced very very differently then your run of the mill speaker.

But yes your right man both types reproduce frequencies in the audible range .


and see my last post edit...
#11
The fact is, Wiki or not, as long as you can cover your guitar's frequency range, you're good. You might not get the same exact sound, considering it's not the same speaker, but you could use another speaker and get a better sound.

As for breaking up the power limitation, I don't doubt some brands do that. The way I see it, you will VERY rarely surpass the power of the speaker. If I'm correct, the power limitation on a speaker is continuous power. In this case, the actual power deliveration will rarely surpass the wattage of the speaker. Anyways personnally, I wouldn't go below what your amp can deliver. Unless you don't mind replacing blown out speakers.

EDIT: Don't get me wrong. A speaker made for a guitar amp will most likely sound better then another one, because it was specificly made for guitar. The point is you could find another speaker that would do a great job. Of course tho, you need to know your stuff. You can't just go out there and try any speaker you find.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

Last edited by Spike6sic6 at Jul 23, 2010,
#12
Fair enough…

I guess I was reading your original post when you said “do the job”. Cause like you could use a resistor for a load and it would do the job. There is no doubt a speaker with the correct impedance and power rating can work with a given amp. I strongly disagree with the fact that any given speakers with those two parameters will sound good though.
#13
Quote by kurtlives91
Fair enough…

I guess I was reading your original post when you said “do the job”. Cause like you could use a resistor for a load and it would do the job. There is no doubt a speaker with the correct impedance and power rating can work with a given amp. I strongly disagree with the fact that any given speakers with those two parameters will sound good though.


I agree, maybe I mis-expressed myself. Two speakers with the exact same specs WILL sound different. You could compare two coils of the same inductance, and they will not respond exactly like each others.

I was merely pointing out that if TS feels comfortable with electronics, he could experiment. That could save him money.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.